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Vocabulary Word

Word: tempestuous

Definition: stormy; violent; impassioned; N. tempest: violent storm


Sentences Containing 'tempestuous'

"In judging of that tempestuous wind called Euroclydon," says an old writer--of whose works I possess the only copy extant--"it maketh a marvellous difference, whether thou lookest out at it from a glass window where the frost is all on the outside, or whether thou observest it from that sashless window, where the frost is on both sides, and of which the wight Death is the only glazier."
Burns quickly learns that any attempt to kidnap the tempestuous boy will require great skill.
I looked with sympathetic awe and fearfulness upon the man, who in mid-winter just landed from a four years' dangerous voyage, could so unrestingly push off again for still another tempestuous term.
In a moment he restrained himself so powerfully that the tempestuous heaving of his breast subsided, as turbulent and foaming waves yield to the sun's genial influence when the cloud has passed.
In tempestuous times like these, after everything above and aloft has been secured, nothing more can be done but passively to await the issue of the gale.
It stood on a sharp bleak corner, where that tempestuous wind Euroclydon kept up a worse howling than ever it did about poor Paul's tossed craft.
On Monday, 13 November 1643, "in the morning, in regard of the bad success of the preceding day's service and the disheartening which our men sustained by it, together with the present foulness of the weather (for it was a very tempestuous morning of wind, rain and snow) all the forces were again withdrawn to Basingstoke, where we refreshed our men and dried our clothes".
Poor Lazarus there, chattering his teeth against the curbstone for his pillow, and shaking off his tatters with his shiverings, he might plug up both ears with rags, and put a corn-cob into his mouth, and yet that would not keep out the tempestuous Euroclydon.
Rainer describes her father as "possessive" and "tempestuous", but whose affections and concern centered on her.
The album's eighth track, "Bruised", contains a repetitive "da-na-na" backing vocal and is lyrically about a tempestuous relationship.
With the knights of these days, for the most part, it is the damask, brocade, and rich stuffs they wear, that rustle as they go, not the chain mail of their armour; no knight now-a-days sleeps in the open field exposed to the inclemency of heaven, and in full panoply from head to foot; no one now takes a nap, as they call it, without drawing his feet out of the stirrups, and leaning upon his lance, as the knights-errant used to do; no one now, issuing from the wood, penetrates yonder mountains, and then treads the barren, lonely shore of the sea--mostly a tempestuous and stormy one--and finding on the beach a little bark without oars, sail, mast, or tackling of any kind, in the intrepidity of his heart flings himself into it and commits himself to the wrathful billows of the deep sea, that one moment lift him up to heaven and the next plunge him into the depths; and opposing his breast to the irresistible gale, finds himself, when he least expects it, three thousand leagues and more away from the place where he embarked; and leaping ashore in a remote and unknown land has adventures that deserve to be written, not on parchment, but on brass.

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::: parallel - similar; analogous; corresponding; N: parallel line; person or thing that is parallel (to another); similarity; Ex. know of no parallel to the case; Ex. without parallel; V: be similar to; make parallel; Ex. Your experience parallels mine; CF. unparalleled
::: centrifugal - radiating; departing from the center
::: hypercritical - excessively exacting; too critical (without noticing good qualities)
::: confiscate - seize; take possession of (private property) by official order (usu. as a punishment); commandeer
::: antidote - remedy to counteract a poison or disease; Ex. antidote to the economic troubles
::: rectify - set right; correct; CF. rect-: right
::: compress - force into less space; squeeze; contract; put into fewer words; N: thick mass of cloth pressed to part of the body to stop bleeding or swelling, reduce fever, etc.
::: inept - unsuited; inappropriate; lacking skill; incompetent; CF. inapt: (of statements or ideas) inappropriate
::: cognate - having a common origin; related linguistically; allied by blood; similar or akin in nature; Ex. cognate languages; N.