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Vocabulary Word

Word: pulpit

Definition: raised platform used in preaching (in a church)


Sentences Containing 'pulpit'

"From the pulpit" is often used metaphorically for something which is said with official church authority.
A font and bell tower were added in the 15th century, and a panelled pulpit in the 17th.
A further restoration in 1872 involved re-roofing the church, new pews and a new pulpit.
A hundred black faces turned round in their rows to peer; and beyond, a black Angel of Doom was beating a book in a pulpit.
All the church fittings are relatively new other than the pulpit which dates from 1633.
Arrayed in decent black; occupying a conspicuous pulpit; intent on bible leaves; what a candidate for an archbishopric, what a lad for a Pope were this mincer!* *Bible leaves!
At my first glimpse of the pulpit, it had not escaped me that however convenient for a ship, these joints in the present instance seemed unnecessary.
Cream paint has been used for the pews, pulpit and reading desk.
Flowers may also stand in front of the pulpit.
He avoided the custom of treating controversial matter in the pulpit and confined himself to the exposition of fundamental truths.
He retired from this pulpit in the Spring of 1872.
Here he remained five years, maturing his pulpit style, and, writing under his initials of 'A.
His pew's right over opposite ourn--on t'other side the pulpit."
http://www.bluegumjoinery.com.au/Custom_lecterns.html church pulpit
In some Protestant churches, the pulpit is considered the most important piece of furniture in the sanctuary.
It is where the minister stands and may be decorated with a 'pulpit fall'- a piece of cloth that covers the top of the pulpit and hangs down the front.
It was a carved wooden pulpit in the Rococo style, ornamented with round mirrors and gold leaf.
Nor was the pulpit itself without a trace of the same sea-taste that had achieved the ladder and the picture.
often, the one on the left (as viewed by the congregation) is called the pulpit.
Perwanger's workshop produced figural sculptures and woodcarving works in the pulpit, confessionals and decorations for local churches.
Pulpit is a speakers' stand in a church.
Richards states it is the oldest wooden pulpit in England, and possibly in the world.
Sculptor Eva Ryynänen carved the church pulpit.
Since the Gospel lesson is often read from the pulpit, the pulpit side of the church is sometimes called the "gospel side".
Some remains are also stored at Norsk Folkemuseum in Oslo where the pulpit and altarpiece are displayed.
The bishop's throne and pulpit are also of considerable quality.
The building was renovated in 1833 with gothic windows, new pews and with the altar, pulpit and original reredos at the north end.
The Central Pulpit is intended to give visual representation of this idea.
The choir organ, a counterpart of the pulpit, was made in 1746 by Nikolaus Rumel the elder.
The church contains the oldest wooden pulpit in England and a late 12th-century Norman font.
The church has a Jacobean pulpit and a chained bible (also known as a "Great Bible").
The interior of the chancel contains a 17th-century pulpit and communion rails as well as a piscina and font from the former church at North Wootton.
The large pulpit ("ambo") found in Basilica A is the only surviving "ambo" from the early Byzantine period and is kept in the garden of the Hagia Sophia.
The ornate pulpit is from about 1645 and bears Christian IV's emblem.
The pulpit and the main entrance were located at different sides of the building.
The pulpit dates from the 17th century; it is plain but has a reading desk decorated with arcading.
The pulpit is of stone and wrought iron.
The pulpit of Michaels Church is hand-carved wood, featuring two Birds of Paradise ().
The pulpit was carved out of stones from Canterbury Cathedral; Glastonbury Abbey provided stone for the bishop's formal seat, the cathedra.
The pulpit was located in one of the interior corners of the crucifix, between two arms of the cross.
The section of the cloister next to the church was used as a lecture-hall and had to be furnished with a pulpit.
The table could be situated in front of the pulpit or to the side, and sometimes was not in the chancel area at all.
The tablet hung behind the pulpit of the Second Church when it was located at Seventh and Arch Streets.
Thus many buildings which once had a central pulpit now have a pulpit to the side.
Traditional Presbyterian Churches in Scotland and elsewhere often had a Central pulpit, that is, the Pulpit was located in the centre of the chancel in the position where most churches have the communion table or altar.
Two important items of furniture in the church are the 14th-century pulpit and the Norman font.
We had not needed the information, delivered from the pulpit that evening, that Lem's was a case of special judgment we knew that, already.
What could be more full of meaning?--for the pulpit is ever this earth's foremost part; all the rest comes in its rear; the pulpit leads the world.
When Miss Mills undertook the office and returned with Dora, exhorting us, from the pulpit of her own bitter youth, to mutual concession, and the avoidance of the Desert of Sahara!
Yes, the world's a ship on its passage out, and not a voyage complete; and the pulpit is its prow.

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::: concomitant - that which accompanies; Ex. Deafnes is a frequent concommitant of old age; ADJ: existing or happening together with something else
::: remit - transmit (money) in payment; free someone from a debt or punishment
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::: impuissance - powerlessness; feebleness
::: pittance - small amount (of money); small allowance or wage
::: mayhem - injury to body; crime of willfully maiming or crippling a person; violent disorder; Ex. mayhem in the zoo; CF. maim