Vocabulary Builder

Vocabulary Builder

    Improve Your Writing

  • Boost your vocabulary
  • See words in the context of real sentences
  • Learn by association and by definition
  • Master a new lexicon!

Get Started Below

Vocabulary Word

Word: perverse

Definition: purposely continuing to do something wrong; stubbornly wrongheaded; perverted; directed away from what is right; wicked and unacceptable; Ex. perverse satisfaction; Ex. Hannibal Lecter in a perverse mood; N. perversity


Sentences Containing 'perverse'

"Perverse Recollections of a Necromangler" (2007-2009).
A book about Kalman and M's work, "Tibor Kalman: Perverse Optimist", was published by Princeton Architectural Press in 1999.
After the first wave of missionary activities in China during the late Ming to early Qing dynasties, the Qing government officially banned Catholicism (Protestantism was considered outlawed by the same decree, as it was linked to Catholicism) in 1724 and lumped it together with other 'perverse sects and sinister doctrines' in Chinese folk religion.
And to prove it, thou knowest already, Sancho, by experience which cannot lie or deceive, how easy it is for enchanters to change one countenance into another, turning fair into foul, and foul into fair; for it is not two days since thou sawest with thine own eyes the beauty and elegance of the peerless Dulcinea in all its perfection and natural harmony, while I saw her in the repulsive and mean form of a coarse country wench, with cataracts in her eyes and a foul smell in her mouth; and when the perverse enchanter ventured to effect so wicked a transformation, it is no wonder if he effected that of Samson Carrasco and thy gossip in order to snatch the glory of victory out of my grasp.
And yet, I was perverse enough to feel a chill and disappointment in receiving no welcome, and rattling, alone and silent, through the misty streets.
As E.W. Swanton noted "It was a tour which saw all sorts of perverse happenings - from an injury list that never stopped (and culminated in only 12 out of 18 being fit to fly to New Zealand), to the dis-satisfaction with umpiring and bowlers' actions that so undermined morale.
At any time it is a strange sight to the tyro to see with what wondrous habitude of unconscious skill the whaleman will maintain an erect posture in his boat, even when pitched about by the most riotously perverse and cross-running seas.
For he who does not respect his parents but respects others, we call that perverse courtesy.
For their time, Hitchcock's films were regarded as rather sexualized, often dealing with perverse and taboo behaviors.
His intention was to restore the philosophy of Plato, the genuine Pythagorean and mediator between Socrates and Pythagoras in its original purity, cleared from the Aristotelian and Stoic doctrines, and purified from the unsatisfactory and perverse explanations, which he said were found even in Speusippus and Xenocrates, and which, through the influence of Arcesilaus and Carneades had led to a bottomless skepticism.
It was also well reviewed by David Langness, for Paste magazine, who called the novel "touching", "modest" and "powerful"; stating that ""Seldom Disappointed" unfolds with the quiet country cadences of the storytellers that consistently suffuse Hillerman's prose" and praising its "hilarious, perverse black humor".
Mary Ellen Synon, a columnist with the newspaper, caused much controversy when she attacked the Paralympic Games as being "perverse", in an article of 22 October 2000.
Mr. Wickham's society was of material service in dispelling the gloom which the late perverse occurrences had thrown on many of the Longbourn family.
Never did a perverse nature declare itself more prematurely, and yet it was not owing to any fault in his bringing up.
On November 21, 2007 their debut album "Perverse Recollections of a Necromangler", was released on Necrohamonic Records.
That she should struggle against the fascinating influence of his delightful art--delightful nature I thought it then--did not surprise me either; for I knew that she was sometimes jaundiced and perverse.
The battle lasted nearly half an hour, and then the phantoms fled; Dona Rodriguez gathered up her skirts, and bemoaning her fate went out without saying a word to Don Quixote, and he, sorely pinched, puzzled, and dejected, remained alone, and there we will leave him, wondering who could have been the perverse enchanter who had reduced him to such a state; but that shall be told in due season, for Sancho claims our attention, and the methodical arrangement of the story demands it.
The conflict and its aftermath led the author to undertake a major re-examination of European bourgeois society, including the sources of the willful, perverse destructiveness displayed by much of civilised humanity.
There is also the perverse, maternal relationship that ultimately develops between Clifford and Mrs. Bolton, his caring nurse, after Connie has left. Mind and body.
Thus for he who does not love his parents but loves others, we call that perverse virtue.
Top scientist Dr Münchhausen and his son invented a perverse death-rape machine to summon the Lord of Chaos—but the machine overloaded; and helped to destroy half of Berlin—leaving Münchhausen II alive, but psychologically scarred.
Yet I am of opinion, this defect arises chiefly from a perverse, restive disposition; for they are cunning, malicious, treacherous, and revengeful.
Yet, the same social norms that consider aggression, greed and lust an advantage to men in public life also view such things as perverse in women.
``Certainly, I might have lived happily amongst those good people, who adored me, but my perverse disposition prevailed over the virtues which my adopted mother endeavored to instil into my heart.

More Vocab Words

::: ravel - fall apart into tangles; entangle; unravel or untwist
::: unanimity - complete agreement; ADJ. unanimous
::: relapse - return to a former state (esp. after improvement); N.
::: abject - (of a condition) wretched; as low as possible; lacking pride; very humble; showing lack of self-respect; Ex. abject apology
::: volatile - changeable; of a quickly changing nature (as of temper); mercurial; tending to violence; evaporating rapidly; Ex. volatile character/situation in the street
::: recourse - resorting to help when in trouble; Ex. without recourse to
::: plaudit - praise; enthusiastic approval; round(succession or series) of applause; ADJ. plauditory; CF. applaud
::: depose - dethrone; remove from office; give a deposition; testify
::: monastic - related to monks or monasteries; removed from worldly concerns
::: clandestine - secret