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Vocabulary Word

Word: nominal

Definition: in name only; of a name; trifling; (of a sum of money) very small; CF. nominate: propose as a candidate; appoint


Sentences Containing 'nominal'

(In slang "izé" and its verbal and nominal derivatives often take on sexual meanings).
A., there is now another vacancy open which entitles a member of the League to a salary of 4 pounds a week for purely nominal services.
All other debtors in the state were allowed the same privilege, and might pay with the same nominal sum of the new and debased coin whatever they had borrowed in the old.
All the plays must continue their study at the same time and they got 400 RMB per month as nominal allowance.
Appa Saheb was allowed to rule over nominal territories with several restrictions.
But in 1562, the year at which he ends with it, it contained no more than the same nominal sum does at present.
But the increase of the value of silver had, it seems, so far compensated the diminution of the quantity of it contained in the same nominal sum, that the legislature did not think it worth while to attend to this circumstance.
By old English statutory law, the whale is declared "a royal fish."* Oh, that's only nominal!
Conversely, the minimum primary current a CT can accurately measure is "light load," or 10% of the nominal current (there are, however, special CTs designed to measure accurately currents as small as 2% of the nominal current).
English allows what is called a "free", "fused" or "nominal" relative construction—a relative construction that does not modify an external noun phrase, and instead has a nominal function fused into it.
GA-2 has one male employee, the friendly and affable Section Chief , whose role can at best be described as that of a nominal caretaker.
Gold rose in its nominal value, or in the quantity of silver which was given for it.
Having only nominal existence within a municipal borough, the civil parishes were merged in 1949.
He then remained as the nominal head of state of the Lithuanian SSR until 1967.
His brother William was appointed leader of the expedition with his son Jerningham as his nominal secretary.
In 1855, nominal land settlements were established.
In this state of things, and during the continuance of any one regulated proportion of this kind, the distinction between the metal, which is the standard, and that which is not the standard, becomes little more than a nominal distinction.
It held that if debentures are convertible into shares, they may not be issued at a price below the nominal share price.
It is not the real, but the nominal price of corn, which can in any considerable degree be affected by the bounty.
It is not their nominal price only, but their real price, which rises in the progress of improvement.
It was credited with the nominal ability to penetrate armour.
Its real price may be said to consist in the quantity of the necessaries and conveniencies of life which are given for it; its nominal price, in the quantity of money.
Members are denominated with the post-nominal letters SCL.
OF THE REAL AND NOMINAL PRICE OF COMMODITIES, OR OF THEIR PRICE IN LABOUR, AND THEIR PRICE IN MONEY.
Officers awarded the medal were entitled to used the post-nominal UD.
One has to register oneself beforehand to attend the class for which a nominal fee is charged.
partially recognized secessionist state under nominal international administration Slovakia.
Pronouns, adjectives, and verbs reflect the noun gender of the nominal they refer to.
Recipients of the Canadian Forces Decoration are entitled to use the post nominal letters "CD".
Steerer tubes come mainly in two common nominal sizes: 1" and 1".
The labourer is rich or poor, is well or ill rewarded, in proportion to the real, not to the nominal price of his labour.
The loss which Spain and Portugal could sustain by this exportation of their gold and silver, would be altogether nominal and imaginary.
The Ministry of Defence leases St Kilda from the National Trust for Scotland for a nominal fee.
The nominal electrical power of block 2, in service since 1988, is 1400 megawatts.
The nominal electrical power of block I, in service since 1976, is 840 megawatts.
The nominal GDP growth rate was below zero for most of the 5 years after the tax hike.
The nominal value of all sorts of goods would be greater, but their real value would be precisely the same as before.
The peace was nominal only, while the burghers were also involved in disputes with other tribes.
The quantity of silver, however, contained in that nominal sum was, during the course of this period, continually diminishing in consequence of some alterations which were made in the coin.
The rise of their nominal price is the effect, not of any degradation of the value of silver, but of the rise in their real price.
The same real price is always of the same value; but on account of the variations in the value of gold and silver, the same nominal price is sometimes of very different values.
The separate parishes continued with nominal existence.
The World Bank estimates the nominal GDP of the territories at 4,007,000 US$ and of Israel at 161,822,000 US$.
There were 123 commemorative coins all together, which had a nominal value of 5, 10 or 20 Mark.
Therefore this population formed the base of the nominal subspecies of the black rhinoceros.
This nominal sum, therefore, is necessarily higher when the coin is much debased by clipping and wearing, than when near to its standard value.
This post-nominal is not affected by the awarding of clasps.
Through the greater part of Europe, too, the expense of land-carriage increases very much both the real and nominal price of most manufactures.
Thus, it is the nominal genus of the family Loricariidae.
What is called bank money, is always of more value than the same nominal sum of common currency.

More Vocab Words

::: blunder - error; stupid mistake
::: recalcitrant - disobedient or resisting authority even after being punished; obstinately stubborn; determined to resist authority; unruly; Ex. recalcitrant child
::: prohibitive - so high as to prohibit purchase or use; tending to prevent the purchase or use of something; prohibiting; inclined to prevent or forbid; Ex. prohibitive tax
::: canvass - determine or seek opinions, votes, etc.; go through (a region) to solicit votes or orders; conduct a survey; N.
::: clavicle - collarbone
::: avid - greedy; extremely eager for; Ex. avid learner; N. avidity
::: retribution - deserved punishment for wrongdoing; punishment for offenses; compensation; vengeance; CF. pay back
::: veritable - being truly so; real or genuine; actual; not false or imaginary
::: ablution - washing
::: rapport - close relationship; emotional closeness; harmony