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Vocabulary Word

Word: diversion

Definition: act of turning aside; pastime; V. divert: turn aside from a course; distract; amuse


Sentences Containing 'diversion'

In front of it, seated in chairs, as in a garden of public diversion, are a number of women, busily knitting.
It is the call of nature, which requires to be relieved by some indulgence, sometimes of ease only, but sometimes too of dissipation and diversion.
Among the ladies were two of a mischievous and frolicsome turn, and, though perfectly modest, somewhat free in playing tricks for harmless diversion sake.
The blowing of the coach-horn in the yard was a seasonable diversion, which made me get up and hesitatingly inquire, in the mingled pride and diffidence of having a purse (which I took out of my pocket), if there were anything to pay.
This would occasion a diversion in Jip's favour, and some inking of his nose, perhaps, as a penalty.
This diversion is only practised by those persons who are candidates for great employments, and high favour at court.
There is likewise another diversion, which is only shown before the emperor and empress, and first minister, upon particular occasions.
While he was thus reasoning and resolving with himself, a _sardral_, or gentleman-usher, came from court, commanding my master to carry me immediately thither for the diversion of the queen and her ladies.
Her majesty used to put a bit of meat upon one of my dishes, out of which I carved for myself, and her diversion was to see me eat in miniature: for the queen (who had indeed but a weak stomach) took up, at one mouthful, as much as a dozen English farmers could eat at a meal, which to me was for some time a very nauseous sight.
Here I often used to row for my own diversion, as well as that of the queen and her ladies, who thought themselves well entertained with my skill and agility.
The captain was very well satisfied with this plain relation I had given him, and said, “he hoped, when we returned to England, I would oblige the world by putting it on paper, and making it public.” My answer was, “that we were overstocked with books of travels: that nothing could now pass which was not extraordinary; wherein I doubted some authors less consulted truth, than their own vanity, or interest, or the diversion of ignorant readers; that my story could contain little beside common events, without those ornamental descriptions of strange plants, trees, birds, and other animals; or of the barbarous customs and idolatry of savage people, with which most writers abound.
I gave due praises to every thing I saw, whereof his excellency took not the least notice till after supper; when, there being no third companion, he told me with a very melancholy air “that he doubted he must throw down his houses in town and country, to rebuild them after the present mode; destroy all his plantations, and cast others into such a form as modern usage required, and give the same directions to all his tenants, unless he would submit to incur the censure of pride, singularity, affectation, ignorance, caprice, and perhaps increase his majesty’s displeasure; that the admiration I appeared to be under would cease or diminish, when he had informed me of some particulars which, probably, I never heard of at court, the people there being too much taken up in their own speculations, to have regard to what passed here below.” The sum of his discourse was to this effect: “That about forty years ago, certain persons went up to Laputa, either upon business or diversion, and, after five months continuance, came back with a very little smattering in mathematics, but full of volatile spirits acquired in that airy region: that these persons, upon their return, began to dislike the management of every thing below, and fell into schemes of putting all arts, sciences, languages, and mechanics, upon a new foot.
And to set forth the valour of my own dear countrymen, I assured him, “that I had seen them blow up a hundred enemies at once in a siege, and as many in a ship, and beheld the dead bodies drop down in pieces from the clouds, to the great diversion of the spectators.” I was going on to more particulars, when my master commanded me silence.
This was a matter of diversion to my master and his family, as well as of mortification to myself.
It may seem strange that of all men sailors should be tinkering at their last wills and testaments, but there are no people in the world more fond of that diversion.
Lord and master over all this scene, the captain stood erect on the ship's elevated quarter-deck, so that the whole rejoicing drama was full before him, and seemed merely contrived for his own individual diversion.

More Vocab Words

::: functional - made for practical use only (without decoration); functioning; Ex. functional modern furniture; CF. functionalism
::: insolence - impudent disrespect; haughtiness; ADJ. insolent; CF. haughty + rude
::: adjunct - something attached to but holding an inferior position
::: consanguineous - (consanguine) having a common ancestor
::: gentility - those of gentle birth; high social class; refinement; quality of being genteel
::: studious - given to diligent study
::: exemplify - show by example; furnish an example; serve as an example of; Ex. His pictures exemplify that sort of painting.
::: egotistical - egotistic; excessively self-centered(egocentric); self-important; conceited
::: skulk - move furtively and secretly; Ex. He skulked through the less fashionable sections of the city.
::: mitigate - appease; moderate; make or become less in force or intensity