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Vocabulary Word

Word: discretion

Definition: prudence; ability to adjust actions to circumstances; freedom of action or judgment; ADJ. discreet; CF. discretionary


Sentences Containing 'discretion'

``Kitty has no discretion in her coughs,''said her father;``she times them ill.''``I do not cough for my own amusement,''replied Kitty fretfully.
We may as well wait, perhaps, till the circumstance occurs before we discuss the discretion of his behavior thereupon.
Lydia laughed, and said:``Aye, that is just like your formality and discretion.
As we have said, the inspector, from discretion, and that he might not disturb the Abbe Faria's pupil in his researches, had seated himself in a corner, and was reading Le Drapeau Blanc.
Since I have arrived at years of discretion and become my own master, I have been constantly seeking him, but all in vain.
Her face, therefore, like that of the gentleman, was perfectly unknown to the two concierges, who were perhaps unequalled throughout the capital for discretion.
Holmes returning he showed it to him, ask'd him if he knew Keith, and what kind of man he was; adding his opinion that he must be of small discretion to think of setting a boy up in business who wanted yet three years of being at man's estate.
To judge whether he is fit to be employed, may surely be trusted to the discretion of the employers, whose interest it so much concerns.
The direction of operations, besides, which must be varied with every change of the weather, as well as with many other accidents, requires much more judgment and discretion, than that of those which are always the same, or very nearly the same.
The condition of the materials which he works upon, too, is as variable as that of the instruments which he works with, and both require to be managed with much judgment and discretion.
The common ploughman, though generally regarded as the pattern of stupidity and ignorance, is seldom defective in this judgment and discretion.
Their competition might, perhaps, ruin some of themselves; but to take care of this, is the business of the parties concerned, and it may safely be trusted to their discretion.
He made war according to his own discretion, frequently against his neighbours, and sometimes against his sovereign.
They still continued to make war according to their own discretion, almost continually upon one another, and very frequently upon the king; and the open country still continued to be a scene of violence, rapine, and disorder.
The application is pretty much regulated according to the discretion of the intendant of the generality, and must, therefore, be in a great measure arbitrary.
The intendant, in order to be sure of finding the sum assessed upon his generality, was empowered to assess it in a larger sum, that the failure or inability of some of the contributors might be compensated by the overcharge of the rest; and till 1765, the fixation of this surplus assessment was left altogether to his discretion.
A young citizen had put out his eye, and been handed over to him by the people to be punished at his own discretion.
Again, that secrets he neither had many, nor often, and such only as concerned public matters: his discretion and moderation, in exhibiting of the public sights and shows for the pleasure and pastime of the people: in public buildings.
Tell whosoever they be that intend not, and guide not by reason and discretion the motions of their own souls, they must of necessity be unhappy.
To comprehend all in a few words, our life is short; we must endeavour to gain the present time with best discretion and justice.
And what do I care for more, if that for which I was born and brought forth into the world (to rule all my desires with reason and discretion) may be?
So that her judgment may say, to that which is befallen her by way of cross: this thou art in very deed, and according to thy true nature: notwithstanding that in the judgment of opinion thou dust appear otherwise: and her discretion to the present object; thou art that, which I sought for.
If thou beest quick-sighted, be so in matter of judgment, and best discretion, saith he.
How much less when by the help of reason she is able to judge of things with discretion?
And if there be anything else that doth hinder thee, go on with prudence and discretion, according to the present occasion and opportunity, still proposing that unto thyself, which thou doest conceive most right and just.
What then is it that may upon this present occasion according to best reason and discretion, either be said or done?
But this readiness of it, it must proceed, not from an obstinate and peremptory resolution of the mind, violently and passionately set upon Opposition, as Christians are wont; but from a peculiar judgment; with discretion and gravity, so that others may be persuaded also and drawn to the like example, but without any noise and passionate exclamations.
When night comes he will sup with the king, queen, and princess; and all the time he will never take his eyes off her, stealing stealthy glances, unnoticed by those present, and she will do the same, and with equal cautiousness, being, as I have said, a damsel of great discretion.
And if it be a guilty one, which may be feared rather than expected, with silence, prudence, and discretion thou canst thyself become the instrument of punishment for the wrong done thee."
At this hole the two demi-damsels posted themselves, and observed Don Quixote on his horse, leaning on his pike and from time to time sending forth such deep and doleful sighs, that he seemed to pluck up his soul by the roots with each of them; and they could hear him, too, saying in a soft, tender, loving tone, "Oh my lady Dulcinea del Toboso, perfection of all beauty, summit and crown of discretion, treasure house of grace, depositary of virtue, and finally, ideal of all that is good, honourable, and delectable in this world!
Come, my son, let us go look for some place where I may hide, while thou dost return, as thou sayest, to seek, and speak with my lady, from whose discretion and courtesy I look for favours more than miraculous."
I tell thee, Sancho, if thou hadst discretion equal to thy mother wit, thou mightst take a pulpit in hand, and go about the world preaching fine sermons."
All those present, and there were a good many, were watching him, and as they saw him there with half a yard of neck, and that uncommonly brown, his eyes shut, and his beard full of soap, it was a great wonder, and only by great discretion, that they were able to restrain their laughter.
It happened that the person who had him in charge was a majordomo of the duke's, a man of great discretion and humour--and there can be no humour without discretion--and the same who played the part of the Countess Trifaldi in the comical way that has been already described; and thus qualified, and instructed by his master and mistress as to how to deal with Sancho, he carried out their scheme admirably.
Don Quixote gave his promise, and swore by the life of his thoughts not to touch so much as a hair of his garments, and to leave him entirely free and to his own discretion to whip himself whenever he pleased.
I understand that this gentleman, your friend, is a man of honour and discretion, whom I may trust with a matter of the most extreme importance.
But you have a discretion beyond your years, and can render me another kind of service, if you will; and a service I will thankfully accept of.'
Traddles still remained, perhaps, but it was very doubtful; and I had not sufficient confidence in his discretion or good luck, however strong my reliance was on his good nature, to wish to trust him with my situation.
"A certain selection and discretion must be used in producing a realistic effect," remarked Holmes.
SHERLOCK HOLMES:--Lord Backwater tells me that I may place implicit reliance upon your judgment and discretion.
He assumed an expression of gloomy intelligence (though I am persuaded he knew no more about the discussion than I did), and highly approved of the discretion that had been observed.
The Doctor's desire that Annie should be entertained, was therefore particularly acceptable to this excellent parent; who expressed unqualified approval of his discretion.
'Really,' interrupted Mrs. Markleham, 'if I have any discretion at all--' ('Which you haven't, you Marplot,' observed my aunt, in an indignant whisper.) --'I must be permitted to observe that it cannot be requisite to enter into these details.'
To this, I added the suggestion, that I should give some explanation of his character and history to Mr. Peggotty, who I knew could be relied on; and that to Mr. Peggotty should be quietly entrusted the discretion of advancing another hundred.
I suppose then, that going plump on a flying whale with your sail set in a foggy squall is the height of a whaleman's discretion?"
The fetid closeness of the air, and a famishing diet, united perhaps to some fears of ultimate retribution, had constrained them to surrender at discretion.
If a man who has no property refuses but once to earn nine shillings for the State, he is put in prison for a period unlimited by any law that I know, and determined only by the discretion of those who put him there; but if he should steal ninety times nine shillings from the State, he is soon permitted to go at large again.

More Vocab Words

::: distend - expand; swell out
::: insensate - without feeling; lacking sense; foolish
::: autonomous - self-governing; N. autonomy
::: repeal - revoke; annul
::: absolute - complete; totally unlimited; having complete power; certain; not relative; Ex. absolute honesty/ruler; CF. absolutism
::: avarice - greediness for wealth
::: genealogy - record of descent; lineage; ancestry; study of ancestry
::: parry - ward off a blow; deflect; Ex. He parried the unwelcome question very skillfully; N. CF.
::: poseur - person who pretends to be sophisticated, elegant, etc., to impress others; person who poses; CF. pose
::: repertoire - list of works of music, drama, etc., a performer is prepared to present; CF. repertory