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Vocabulary Word

Word: dingy

Definition: (of things and place) dirty and dull; Ex. dingy street/curtain


Sentences Containing 'dingy'

A few dingy olives and stunted fig trees struggled hard for existence, but their withered dusty foliage abundantly proved how unequal was the conflict.
He wore a flat gray cloth cap, a dingy wool colored greatcoat, and cowhide boots.
His son obeyed, and the crowd approached; they were bawling and hissing round a dingy hearse and dingy mourning coach, in which mourning coach there was only one mourner, dressed in the dingy trappings that were considered essential to the dignity of the position.
I am sure I knew nothing about him, except that he had originally been alone in the business, and now lived by himself in a house near Montagu Square, which was fearfully in want of painting; that he came very late of a day, and went away very early; that he never appeared to be consulted about anything; and that he had a dingy little black-hole of his own upstairs, where no business was ever done, and where there was a yellow old cartridge-paper pad upon his desk, unsoiled by ink, and reported to be twenty years of age.
I walked from the Custom House to the Monument before I found a coach; and although the very house-fronts, looking on the swollen gutters, were like old friends to me, I could not but admit that they were very dingy friends.
It was a poky, little, shabby-genteel place, where four lines of dingy two-storied brick houses looked out into a small railed-in enclosure, where a lawn of weedy grass and a few clumps of faded laurel-bushes made a hard fight against a smoke-laden and uncongenial atmosphere.
It was a rather dingy night, although a fair number of stars were out.
Samson offered him one, as he knew a friend of his who had it would not refuse it to him, though it was more dingy with rust and mildew than bright and clean like burnished steel.
Senator Banner is playing pool in a dingy pool hall, when a phone call comes in.
Several more brightly clad people met me in the doorway, and so we entered, I, dressed in dingy nineteenth-century garments, looking grotesque enough, garlanded with flowers, and surrounded by an eddying mass of bright, soft-colored robes and shining white limbs, in a melodious whirl of laughter and laughing speech.
The cap color is variable, ranging from dingy yellow to yellowish-orange to ochraceous-salmon, cinnamon-brown or olive-brown to yellow-brown.
The Dingy Grass-dart or Dingy Dart ("Suniana lascivia") is a butterfly of the Hesperiidae family.
The mushroom's dingy yellow to brownish cap is rounded to flattened in shape, slimy when wet, and grows up to wide.
The pore surface on the underside of the cap is yellow to dingy yellow, or yellowish orange to salmon, darkening to brownish with age; it also does not stain when bruised.
They went into a dingy room lined with books and littered with papers, where there was a blazing fire.
Unusually large, dingy yellow legs and feet.
When we had those meetings in the garden of the square, and sat within the dingy summer-house, so happy, that I love the London sparrows to this hour, for nothing else, and see the plumage of the tropics in their smoky feathers!
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