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Vocabulary Word

Word: determinate

Definition: having a fixed order of procedure; precisely defined; invariable; fixed; conclusive; final


Sentences Containing 'determinate'

All ideas, especially abstract ones, are naturally faint and obscure: the mind has but a slender hold of them: they are apt to be confounded with other resembling ideas; and when we have often employed any term, though without a distinct meaning, we are apt to imagine it has a determinate idea annexed to it.
The great advantage of the mathematical sciences above the moral consists in this, that the ideas of the former, being sensible, are always clear and determinate, the smallest distinction between them is immediately perceptible, and the same terms are still expressive of the same ideas, without ambiguity or variation.
If the mind, with greater facility, retains the ideas of geometry clear and determinate, it must carry on a much longer and more intricate chain of reasoning, and compare ideas much wider of each other, in order to reach the abstruser truths of that science.
By what invention can we throw light upon these ideas, and render them altogether precise and determinate to our intellectual view?
It is true, if men attempt the discussion of questions which lie entirely beyond the reach of human capacity, such as those concerning the origin of worlds, or the economy of the intellectual system or region of spirits, they may long beat the air in their fruitless contests, and never arrive at any determinate conclusion.
Where would be the foundation of _morals,_ if particular characters had no certain or determinate power to produce particular sentiments, and if these sentiments had no constant operation on actions?
But as long as we will rashly suppose, that we have some farther idea of necessity and causation in the operations of external objects; at the same time, that we can find nothing farther in the voluntary actions of the mind; there is no possibility of bringing the question to any determinate issue, while we proceed upon so erroneous a supposition.
His excellency, having mounted on the small of my right leg, advanced forwards up to my face, with about a dozen of his retinue; and producing his credentials under the signet royal, which he applied close to my eyes, spoke about ten minutes without any signs of anger, but with a kind of determinate resolution, often pointing forwards, which, as I afterwards found, was towards the capital city, about half a mile distant; whither it was agreed by his majesty in council that I must be conveyed.
Some time after, asking a friend at court how they came to fix on that determinate number, he told me that his majesty’s mathematicians, having taken the height of my body by the help of a quadrant, and finding it to exceed theirs in the proportion of twelve to one, they concluded from the similarity of their bodies, that mine must contain at least 1724 of theirs, and consequently would require as much food as was necessary to support that number of Lilliputians.
There was an infinity of firmest fortitude, a determinate, unsurrenderable wilfulness, in the fixed and fearless, forward dedication of that glance.
But they precisely agree in all their grand features; nor has there yet been presented a single determinate fact upon which to ground a radical distinction.
But that thing of his dissembling was only subject to his perceptibility, not to his will determinate.

More Vocab Words

::: impassive - without feeling; expressionless; imperturbable; stoical; Ex. impassive face
::: aspire - seek to attain (position or status); long for; Ex. aspire to become president; Ex. aspire to/after the leadership
::: cunning - clever in deceiving; sly; N: cleverness in deceiving; deceit
::: retain - keep; maintain possession of; employ (esp. a lawyer or advisor); N. retainer: servant; fee paid to retain an advisor
::: lassitude - languor; weariness; listlessness
::: ligneous - like wood
::: cozen - cheat; hoodwink; swindle
::: flotsam - drifting wreckage
::: prodigal - wasteful; reckless with money; profuse; Ex. a mind prodigal of ideas; N. prodigality
::: enamored - in love; Ex. enamored of his own beauty; V. enamor: inspire with love