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Vocabulary Word

Word: clasp

Definition: hold firmly within arms


Sentences Containing 'clasp'

It does not clasp its hands and pray to Jupiter.
Then there was the ring with the lion's head, which Caesar wore when he wanted to greet his friends with a clasp of the hand.
Edmond could only clasp his hands and exclaim,``Oh, my friend, my friend, speak not thus!''
No longer could Edmond look into those wide open eyes which had seemed to be penetrating the mysteries of death; no longer could he clasp the hand which had done so much to make his existence blessed.
But in ascending the series from simple twiners to leaf-climbers, an important quality is added, namely sensitiveness to a touch, by which means the foot-stalks of the leaves or flowers, or these modified and converted into tendrils, are excited to bend round and clasp the touching object.
But you see how compassionate heaven sends aid in our sorest need; Don Gaiferos advances, and without minding whether the rich petticoat is torn or not, he seizes her and by force brings her to the ground, and then with one jerk places her on the haunches of his horse, astraddle like a man, and bids her hold on tight and clasp her arms round his neck, crossing them on his breast so as not to fall, for the lady Melisendra was not used to that style of riding.
He chased me round and round the place with a clasp-knife, calling me the Angel of Death, and saying he would kill me, and then I couldn't come for him no more.
I took the bag to where it used to stand, and ripped a hole in the bottom of it with the saw, for there warn't no knives and forks on the place --pap done everything with his clasp-knife about the cooking.
I saw her stand where he had left her, like a statue; and then bend down her head, and clasp her hands, and weep, I cannot say how sorrowfully.
The preparations she made for this great work, the aprons she put on, the bibs she borrowed from the kitchen to keep off the ink, the time she took, the innumerable stoppages she made to have a laugh with Jip as if he understood it all, her conviction that her work was incomplete unless she signed her name at the end, and the way in which she would bring it to me, like a school-copy, and then, when I praised it, clasp me round the neck, are touching recollections to me, simple as they might appear to other men.
She would clasp me round the neck and laugh, the while, as if I did it for a wager.
She dropped on her face, before the imperious figure in the chair, with an imploring effort to clasp the skirt of her dress.
That Mrs. Steerforth might not be induced to look behind her, and read, plainly written, what she was not yet prepared to know, I met her look quickly; but I had seen Rosa Dartle throw her hands up in the air with vehemence of despair and horror, and then clasp them on her face.
I could not but observe that he had been peeling the lemons with his own clasp-knife, which, as became the knife of a practical settler, was about a foot long; and which he wiped, not wholly without ostentation, on the sleeve of his coat.
As she said the words the brooch flew open, and the Queen clutched wildly at it, and tried to clasp it again.
For though I tried to move his arm--unlock his bridegroom clasp--yet, sleeping as he was, he still hugged me tightly, as though naught but death should part us twain.

More Vocab Words

::: woe - great sorrow; deep inconsolable grief; affliction; suffering; Ex. financial woes
::: surly - bad-tempered; rude; cross
::: convene - come together; assemble; call to meet; Ex. convene the council
::: freebooter - pirate or plunderer who makes war in order to grow rich
::: rapport - close relationship; emotional closeness; harmony
::: defrock - strip a priest or minister of church authority; unfrock
::: conspire - take part in a conspiracy; (of events) work together; combine; Ex. Events conspired to produce great difficulties.
::: tenancy - possession of land or building by rent; period of a tenant's occupancy
::: potential - expressing possibility; latent; N: capacity for growth
::: pedantic - bookish; showing off learning; marked by an excessive ostentatious concern for book learning; N. pedantry