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Vocabulary Word

Word: avarice

Definition: greediness for wealth


Sentences Containing 'avarice'

20a); and once he ventured to convey a veiled rebuke to the patriarch for avarice (Genesis Rabbah lxxviii.
A crooked casino owner who had made a deal for eternal youth with the demon of avarice by selling the souls of his brides to the demon—each one is claimed by the demon seconds after they are pronounced man and wife—attempts to use a love potion to win Zatanna's soul for his master, but when her cousin Zachary—who came to find Zatanna after she missed his show—breaks the spell, the casino owner begs Zatanna to turn him into a soulless lump of gold in order to escape torment in Hell.
A most remarkable circumstance is, that I really don't think he grasped this sum even so much for the gratification of his avarice, which was inordinate, as in the hatred he felt for Copperfield.
Ambition, avarice, self-love, vanity, friendship, generosity, public spirit: these passions, mixed in various degrees, and distributed through society, have been, from the beginning of the world, and still are, the source of all the actions and enterprises, which have ever been observed among mankind.
Among the books appear James Caulfield's "Portraits, Memoirs, and Characters of Remarkable Persons" (1794-5); "Kirby's Wonderful Museum of Remarkable Characters" (1803); Henry Wilson's "Wonderful Characters" (1821); and F. Somner Merryweather's "Lives and Anecdotes of Misers or The Passion of Avarice displayed in the parsimonious habits, unaccountable lives and remarkable deaths of the most notorious misers of all ages" (1850).
And as it was tyranny in any government to require the first, so it was weakness not to enforce the second: for a man may be allowed to keep poisons in his closet, but not to vend them about for cordials.” He observed, “that among the diversions of our nobility and gentry, I had mentioned gaming: he desired to know at what age this entertainment was usually taken up, and when it was laid down; how much of their time it employed; whether it ever went so high as to affect their fortunes; whether mean, vicious people, by their dexterity in that art, might not arrive at great riches, and sometimes keep our very nobles in dependence, as well as habituate them to vile companions, wholly take them from the improvement of their minds, and force them, by the losses they received, to learn and practise that infamous dexterity upon others?” He was perfectly astonished with the historical account gave him of our affairs during the last century; protesting “it was only a heap of conspiracies, rebellions, murders, massacres, revolutions, banishments, the very worst effects that avarice, faction, hypocrisy, perfidiousness, cruelty, rage, madness, hatred, envy, lust, malice, and ambition, could produce.” His majesty, in another audience, was at the pains to recapitulate the sum of all I had spoken; compared the questions he made with the answers I had given; then taking me into his hands, and stroking me gently, delivered himself in these words, which I shall never forget, nor the manner he spoke them in: “My little friend Grildrig, you have made a most admirable panegyric upon your country; you have clearly proved, that ignorance, idleness, and vice, are the proper ingredients for qualifying a legislator; that laws are best explained, interpreted, and applied, by those whose interest and abilities lie in perverting, confounding, and eluding them.
Avarice and injustice are always short-sighted, and they did not foresee how much this regulation must obstruct improvement, and thereby hurt, in the long-run, the real interest of the landlord.
But avarice and ambition in the rich, in the poor the hatred of labour and the love of present ease and enjoyment, are the passions which prompt to invade property; passions much more steady in their operation, and much more universal in their influence.
By frequent repetition, the mind in the long run becomes callous; and thus this mental disease produces confirmed Avarice.
From its point of view, both the miser and the usurer were guilty of the cardinal sin of avarice and the two were often confounded.
From the time of Charlemagne among the French, and from that of William the Conqueror among the English, the proportion between the pound, the shilling, and the penny, seems to have been uniformly the same as at present, though the value of each has been very different; for in every country of the world, I believe, the avarice and injustice of princes and sovereign states, abusing the confidence of their subjects, have by degrees diminished the real quantity of metal, which had been originally contained in their coins.
Good, so much the better,''said Caderousse, his eyes sparkling with avarice.
Hatred evidently inspired the Englishman, who, knowing no other reproach to bring on the count, accused him of avarice.
Many anti-corporate observers would blame the avarice of those at the top of many multi-national corporations, such as the Union Carbide Corporation in Bhopal, for seemingly isolated industrial accidents.
No, it will all go well; M.d'Epinay, if he is an honorable man, will consider himself more than ever pledged to Mademoiselle de Villefort, unless he were actuated by a decided feeling of avarice, but that is impossible.''
Otherwise, as avarice is the necessary consequence of old age, those immortals would in time become proprietors of the whole nation, and engross the civil power, which, for want of abilities to manage, must end in the ruin of the public.
Polyeuctus, thus preserving it from the emperor's avarice.
Purge away thine own, cast forth thence--from thine own mind, not robbers and monsters, but Fear, Desire, Envy, Malignity, Avarice, Effeminacy, Intemperance.
The later Thomas Peckett Prest's "The Miser of Shoreditch or the Curse of Avarice" (1854) was based on a penny dreadful story by him; later he adapted it as a two-act romantic drama set in time of Henry VIII.
The only difference is that the couple engaged in inspecting their money are old, as was the case in all the allegories of avarice.
Therefore since money alone was able to perform all these feats, our _Yahoos_ thought they could never have enough of it to spend, or to save, as they found themselves inclined, from their natural bent either to profusion or avarice; that the rich man enjoyed the fruit of the poor man’s labour, and the latter were a thousand to one in proportion to the former; that the bulk of our people were forced to live miserably, by labouring every day for small wages, to make a few live plentifully.” I enlarged myself much on these, and many other particulars to the same purpose; but his honour was still to seek; for he went upon a supposition, that all animals had a title to their share in the productions of the earth, and especially those who presided over the rest.
They were influenced by hatred, by avarice, and by self love; but I was base, and for want of courage acted against my judgment.
Though, from excess of avarice, in the same manner, the inland corn merchant should sometimes raise the price of his corn somewhat higher than the scarcity of the season requires, yet all the inconveniencies which the people can suffer from this conduct, which effectually secures them from a famine in the end of the season, are inconsiderable, in comparison of what they might have been exposed to by a more liberal way of dealing in the beginning of it the corn merchant himself is likely to suffer the most by this excess of avarice; not only from the indignation which it generally excites against him, but, though he should escape the effects of this indignation, from the quantity of corn which it necessarily leaves upon his hands in the end of the season, and which, if the next season happens to prove favourable, he must always sell for a much lower price than he might otherwise have had.
We are committed to raising capital in accordance with existing rules and regulations.” He added that any errors were “born of inexperience and naivete, not malice or avarice,” and were quickly rectified.
When the Regents first come to power, Javan is the underage brother of an underage king, a position which provides him with virtually no authority or power to fight the Regents' avarice.
Whether they were always so free from avarice, partialities, or want, that a bribe, or some other sinister view, could have no place among them?
Yet another genre was the Allegory of Avarice, of which one of the earliest examples is Albrecht Dürer’s painting of a naked old woman with a sack of coins (1507).
“That in some fields of his country there are certain shining stones of several colours, whereof the _Yahoos_ are violently fond: and when part of these stones is fixed in the earth, as it sometimes happens, they will dig with their claws for whole days to get them out; then carry them away, and hide them by heaps in their kennels; but still looking round with great caution, for fear their comrades should find out their treasure.” My master said, “he could never discover the reason of this unnatural appetite, or how these stones could be of any use to a _Yahoo_; but now he believed it might proceed from the same principle of avarice which I had ascribed to mankind.

More Vocab Words

::: smattering - slight knowledge; small scattered number or amount; Ex. smattering of German
::: unaccountable - unexplicable; impossible to account for; unreasonable or mysterious
::: impeach - charge (a public official) with crime in office; raise doubts about; indict; Ex. impeach a witness's credibility
::: delineate - portray; depict; sketch; describe; N. delineation
::: inhibit - restrain; prohibit; retard or prevent; N. inhibition
::: promontory - headland
::: exemplary - serving as a model; outstanding; Ex. exemplary punishment/behavior; N. exemplar: typical example; model
::: laud - praise; N. ADJ. laudable: praiseworthy; ADJ. laudatory: expressing praise
::: vulgar - of the common people; deficient in refinement; not refined; coarse; Ex. vulgar display of wealth; N. vulgarism: vulgarity; crudely indecent word; CF. vulgarian: vulgar person; boor; lout
::: dour - sullen; gloomy; stubborn