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Vocabulary Word

Word: animosity

Definition: active enmity


Sentences Containing 'animosity'

He resented Mrs. Cruncher's saying grace with particular animosity.
It is not impossible, therefore, that some of the regulations of this famous act may have proceeded from national animosity.
National animosity, at that particular time, aimed at the very same object which the most deliberate wisdom would have recommended, the diminution of the naval power of Holland, the only naval power which could endanger the security of England.
The principles which I have been examining, in the foregoing chapter, took their origin from private interest and the spirit of monopoly; those which I am going te examine in this, from national prejudice and animosity.
National prejudice and animosity, prompted always by the private interest of particular traders, are the principles which generally direct our judgment upon all questions concerning it.
Commerce, which ought naturally to be, among nations as among individuals, a bond of union and friendship, has become the most fertile source of discord and animosity.
Hence, too, the extraordinary restraints upon the importation of almost all sorts of goods from those countries with which the balance of trade is supposed to be disadvantageous; that is, from those against whom national animosity happens ta be most violently inflamed.
If those two countries, however, were to consider their real interest, without either mercantile jealousy or national animosity, the commerce of France might be more advantageous to Great Britain than that of any other country, and, for the same reason, that of Great Britain to France.
Being neighbours, they are necessarily enemies, and the wealth and power of each becomes, upon that account, more formidable to the other; and what would increase the advantage of national friendship, serves only to inflame the violence of national animosity.
Mercantile jealousy is excited, and both inflames, and is itself inflamed, by the violence of national animosity, and the traders of both countries have announced, with all the passionate confidence of interested falsehood, the certain ruin of each, in consequence of that unfavourable balance of trade, which, they pretend, would be the infallible effect of an unrestrained commerce with the other.
When the parish happened to be situated in a great city, it divided all the inhabitants into two parties; and when that city happened, either to constitute itself a little republic, or to be the head and capital of a little republic, as in the case with many of the considerable cities in Switzerland and Holland, every paltry dispute of this kind, over and above exasperating the animosity of all their other factions, threatened to leave behind it, both a new schism in the church, and a new faction in the state.
Not only ignorance and misinformation, but friendship, party animosity, and private resentment, are said frequently to mislead such assessors.
When a nation is already overburdened with taxes, nothing but the necessities of a new war, nothing but either the animosity of national vengeance, or the anxiety for national security, can induce the people to submit, with tolerable patience, to a new tax.
'Why, there's Copperfield, mother,' he angrily retorted, pointing his lean finger at me, against whom all his animosity was levelled, as the prime mover in the discovery; and I did not undeceive him; 'there's Copperfield, would have given you a hundred pound to say less than you've blurted out!'
Then, in darting at the monster, knife in hand, he had but given loose to a sudden, passionate, corporal animosity; and when he received the stroke that tore him, he probably but felt the agonizing bodily laceration, but nothing more.

More Vocab Words

::: mnemonic - pertaining to memory; assisting the memory; N: device, such as as formula or rhyme, used as a mnemonic aid
::: outskirts - fringes; outer borders (as of a city); Ex. outskirts of Boston
::: convoke - call together; Ex. convoke Parliament; N. convocation
::: sodden - thoroughly soaked; dull or stupid as if from drink
::: besmirch - soil; defile; make dirty
::: censorious - severely critical
::: earthy - unrefined; coarse; of earth; Ex. earthy remarks; OP. ethereal
::: nirvana - in Buddhist teachings, the ideal state in which the individual loses himself in the attainment of an impersonal beatitude
::: sporadic - occurring irregularly; intermittent
::: relinquish - give up something (with reluctance); yield; release; Ex. relinquish power/the claim to the land/his hold on my arm