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Vocabulary Word

Word: vogue

Definition: popular fashion; Ex. Jeans became the vogue.


Sentences Containing 'vogue'

But indeed, at that time, putting to death was a recipe much in vogue with all trades and professions, and not least of all with Tellson's.
He wore the white riding coat and top boots, then in vogue, and the light of the fire touching their light surfaces made him look very pale, with his long brown hair, all untrimmed, hanging loose about him.
``Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.
Stories of gypsies, who steal children, are not at all in vogue in this part of the world, and would not be believed.
``Without reckoning,''added Monte Cristo,``that he is on the eve of entering into a sort of speculation already in vogue in the United States and in England, but quite novel in France.''
The methodists, without half the learning of the dissenters, are much more in vogue.
He recommends the prince to use simplicity in his public speeches, and to avoid affectation.(6) Marcus devotes his attention to the old authors who then had a great vogue at Rome: Ennius, Plautus, Nawius, and such orators as Cato and Gracchus.(7) Pronto urges on him the study of Cicero, whose letters, he says, are all worth reading.
At his death in battle in 1143, the castle passed by his will to his son Alfonso Munio, who, as territorial or local surnames were then coming into vogue in place of the simple patronymic, took the additional name of Cervatos.
He was to found a great national drama, based on the true principles of art, that was to be the envy of all nations; he was to drive from the stage the silly, childish plays, the "mirrors of nonsense and models of folly" that were in vogue through the cupidity of the managers and shortsightedness of the authors; he was to correct and educate the public taste until it was ripe for tragedies on the model of the Greek drama--like the "Numancia" for instance--and comedies that would not only amuse but improve and instruct.
All I shall do is to pray to heaven to deliver you from it, and show you how beneficial and necessary knights-errant were in days of yore, and how useful they would be in these days were they but in vogue; but now, for the sins of the people, sloth and indolence, gluttony and luxury are triumphant."
And then, when they condescend to compose a sort of verse that was at that time in vogue in Kandy, which they call seguidillas!
He said, “that new systems of nature were but new fashions, which would vary in every age; and even those, who pretend to demonstrate them from mathematical principles, would flourish but a short period of time, and be out of vogue when that was determined.” I spent five days in conversing with many others of the ancient learned.
And it is highly probable, that such travellers, who shall hereafter visit the countries described in this work of mine, may, by detecting my errors (if there be any), and adding many new discoveries of their own, justle me out of vogue, and stand in my place, making the world forget that ever I was an author.
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::: compensatory - making up for; repaying
::: trinket - knickknack; bauble; cheap jewelry
::: disburse - pay out (as from a fund); N. disbursement; CF. purse
::: indignity - treatment or situation that causes shame or loss of dignity, respect; offensive or insulting treatment; humiliating or degrading treatment; Ex. I suffered the indignity of having to say that in front of them.
::: transmute - transform; change; convert to something different
::: vapid - lacking liveliness; dull and unimaginative; insipid and flavorless; Ex. vapid lecture
::: solace - comfort in sorrow or trouble; consolation; V: comfort or console in time of sorrow or trouble
::: trifling - trivial; unimportant