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Vocabulary Word

Word: vigor

Definition: active strength; energy; enthusiasm; ADJ. vigorous


Sentences Containing 'vigor'

He was now a very energetic man indeed, with great firmness of purpose, strength of resolution, and vigor of action.
A healthy plant brought into a dark room soon loses its vigor and freshness, and becomes yellow and drooping.
Vigor, endurance, and mental alertness are bought by hygienic living; that is, by proper food, fresh air, exercise, cleanliness, and reasonable hours.
Some people wish vigor, endurance, etc., but are unwilling to live the life which will develop these qualities.
It is not for him in the full vigor of inspiration that books such as this are written.
But it will be noticed that besides designing his canvases carefully, he usually balanced the vigor and vitality of his form with a great sobriety of color.
There was something cosmical about it; a standing advertisement, till forbidden, of the everlasting vigor and fertility of the world.
With unrelaxed nerves, with morning vigor, sail by it, looking another way, tied to the mast like Ulysses.
The waste and decay of physical life, which so often needs repair, seemed miraculously retarded in such a case, and the vital vigor stood its ground.
The other day I picked up the lower jaw of a hog, with white and sound teeth and tusks, which suggested that there was an animal health and vigor distinct from the spiritual.
We must be refreshed by the sight of inexhaustible vigor, vast and titanic features, the sea coast with its wrecks, the wilderness with its living and its decaying trees, the thunder cloud, and the rain which lasts three weeks and produces freshets.
Of course it is not absolutely dead, neither is a crippled octogenarian who could once jump twenty two feet on level ground; but as contrasted with what it was in its prime vigor, Mississippi steamboating may be called dead.
I read aloud: mainly imaginary accounts of people snatched from the grave's threshold and restored to life and vigor by a few spoonsful of liquor and a warm bath.
They started with fresh vigor, for they had received food from the old man: but very soon the bear came in sight, and again was fast gaining upon them.
Full of hope, Edmond swallowed a few mouthfuls of bread and water, and, thanks to the vigor of his constitution, found himself well nigh recovered.
The stranger might have numbered sixty or sixty five years; but a certain briskness and appearance of vigor in his movements made it probable that he was aged more from captivity than the course of time.
That very day the miners began their labors, with a vigor and alacrity proportionate to their long rest from fatigue and their hopes of ultimate success.
And they all looked with astonishment at this man whose eye now disclosed an intelligence and his body a vigor they had not thought him capable of showing.
``It is all as he has said; it is very evident that the mind still retains its full force and vigor.''
Everything about the count seemed to have its meaning, for the constant habit of thought which he had acquired had given an ease and vigor to the expression of his face, and even to the most trifling gesture, scarcely to be understood.
I have seen that, mother; I know that from the gulf in which their enemies have plunged them they have risen with so much vigor and glory that in their turn they have ruled their former conquerors, and have punished them.
But as all my remonstrances produced no effect upon Queequeg, I was obliged to acquiesce; and accordingly prepared to set about this business with a determined rushing sort of energy and vigor, that should quickly settle that trifling little affair.
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::: clavicle - collarbone
::: enmity - ill will; hatred; hostility
::: prehensile - capable of grasping or holding (esp. by wrapping around); Ex. prehensile tails
::: unassuaged - unsatisfied; not soothed
::: stoic - stoical; impassive; unmoved by joy or grief; N. CF. stoicism
::: adhere - stick fast; be a devotd follower; N. adhesion: adhering; devotion; loyality
::: detraction - slandering; aspersion; detracting; CF. detractor
::: concoct - prepare by mixing or combining; make up in concert; devise (something false) so as to deceive; Ex. concoct an elaborate excuse for being late; N. concoction
::: procurement - obtaining; V. procure: obtain by effort; obtain (a prostitute) for another