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Vocabulary Word

Word: veracity

Definition: truthfulness; adherence to the truth


Sentences Containing 'veracity'

Of what he has particularly accused me I am ignorant; but of the truth of what I shall relate, I can summon more than one witness of undoubted veracity.
Benedetto maintained the truth of what he had said, and accompanied it with details that did more honor to his imagination than to his veracity.
``Understand, sir, I do not in the least suspect your veracity; I ask if you are certain of it?''
The veracity of Quintus Curtius is as much to be suspected, when he describes the supernatural courage of Alexander, by which he was hurried on singly to attack multitudes, as when he describes his supernatural force and activity, by which he was able to resist them.
What would become of _history,_ had we not a dependence on the veracity of the historian according to the experience which we have had of mankind?
It will be sufficient to observe that our assurance in any argument of this kind is derived from no other principle than our observation of the veracity of human testimony, and of the usual conformity of facts to the reports of witnesses.
The historian, a cotemporary writer, noted for candour and veracity, and withal, the greatest and most penetrating genius, perhaps, of all antiquity; and so free from any tendency to credulity, that he even lies under the contrary imputation, of atheism and profaneness: The persons, from whose authority he related the miracle, of established character for judgement and veracity, as we may well presume; eye-witnesses of the fact, and confirming their testimony, after the Flavian family was despoiled of the empire, and could no longer give any reward, as the price of a lie.
Mere reason is insufficient to convince us of its veracity: And whoever is moved by _Faith_ to assent to it, is conscious of a continued miracle in his own person, which subverts all the principles of his understanding, and gives him a determination to believe what is most contrary to custom and experience.
It recommends an universal doubt, not only of all our former opinions and principles, but also of our very faculties; of whose veracity, say they, we must assure ourselves, by a chain of reasoning, deduced from some original principle, which cannot possibly be fallacious or deceitful.
To have recourse to the veracity of the supreme Being, in order to prove the veracity of our senses, is surely making a very unexpected circuit.
If his veracity were at all concerned in this matter, our senses would be entirely infallible; because it is not possible that he can ever deceive.
Do you follow the instincts and propensities of nature, may they say, in assenting to the veracity of sense?
There is an air of truth apparent through the whole; and indeed the author was so distinguished for his veracity, that it became a sort of proverb among his neighbours at Redriff, when any one affirmed a thing, to say, it was as true as if Mr. Gulliver had spoken it.
Do these miserable animals presume to think, that I am so degenerated as to defend my veracity?
This gentleman treated me with kindness, and desired I would let him know what place I came from last, and whither I was bound; which I did in a few words, but he thought I was raving, and that the dangers I underwent had disturbed my head; whereupon I took my black cattle and sheep out of my pocket, which, after great astonishment, clearly convinced him of my veracity.
And, as truth always forces its way into rational minds, so this honest worthy gentleman, who had some tincture of learning, and very good sense, was immediately convinced of my candour and veracity.
I asked him, “whether it were the custom in his country to say the thing which was not?” I assured him, “I had almost forgot what he meant by falsehood, and if I had lived a thousand years in _Houyhnhnmland_, I should never have heard a lie from the meanest servant; that I was altogether indifferent whether he believed me or not; but, however, in return for his favours, I would give so much allowance to the corruption of his nature, as to answer any objection he would please to make, and then he might easily discover the truth.” The captain, a wise man, after many endeavours to catch me tripping in some part of my story, at last began to have a better opinion of my veracity.
Here are three instances, then, which I personally know the truth of; but I have heard of many other instances from persons whose veracity in the matter there is no good ground to impeach.

More Vocab Words

::: interpolate - insert between
::: peremptory - demanding and leaving no choice; imperative; Ex. peremptory decree/knock
::: repugnance - disgust; strong dislike; loathing; ADJ. repugnant: arousing disgust; repulsive
::: pinch - squeeze between the thumb and a finger, or other edges; Ex. I had to pinch myself to make sure I wasn't dreaming. N: amount that can be held between the thumb and a finger
::: elusive - evasive; not frank; baffling; hard to grasp, catch, or understand; V. elude: escape from; escape the understanding or grasp of; Ex. elude the hunter; Ex. His name eludes me.
::: shimmer - shine with a flickering light; glimmer intermittently; Ex. The moonlight shimmered on the water; N.
::: brisk - quick and active; marked by liveliness and vigor
::: larceny - theft; Ex. petit larceny
::: affinity - feeling of kinship; similarity; Ex. strong affinity for her; Ex. many affinities between two languages
::: inherent - firmly established by nature or habit; intrinsic