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Vocabulary Word

Word: unruly

Definition: disobedient; lawless; difficult to control


Sentences Containing 'unruly'

A demonstration on 4 March 1919 passed peacefully, but later that month, six demonstrators were killed by Czech troops after a demonstrations turned unruly.
According to Subotić's recollections, the celebration in the street of Prague were monitored and declared unruly by the Austrian authorities.
Benjamin Harris High School is set in the impoverished, unruly inner-city Bronx.
He brings along the body of Marc Corman, one of the unruly cowhands from the recent drunken spree in Bannock, carrying it on the back of a horse.
He was infamous for his combative and unruly behaviour.
However, unruly crowds are becoming more of a problem at Victorian Bushrangers home games, which can attract huge crowds but have only a minuscule security presence compared to international games.
It is presently best known as the ceremonial staff of the Anglican and Episcopalian lay church officers known as verger (or originally "virger" : the title derives from virge), who originally used it as a 'weapon' to make way for the ecclesiastical procession (compare the catholic garde suisse), and occasionally to chastise unruly choristers.
Legend has it, if trespassers are caught, the unruly dwarves cut their legs from the knees down, so they are forced to live like one of them.
Lo, Miss Pross, in harness of string, awakening the echoes, as an unruly charger, whip corrected, snorting and pawing the earth under the plane tree in the garden!
pp. 152–153) In the 1870s, as the Fenian threat began to gradually wane and the Victorian moral reform movement gained momentum, Toronto police primarily functioned in the role of "urban missionaries" whose function it was to regulate unruly and immoral behaviour among the "lower classes".
She was asked to teach the Boys Brigade class, made up of the most unruly boys in the area.
Soon after, a ship arrives at the island, carrying unruly sailors, a proud captain, and his beautiful but spoiled daughter, Sylvia Hilliard. The party is welcomed by the young couple, and they ask to be taken back to civilization, after many years in isolation.
The Yang family, continued to rule over 48 unruly Tibetan clans in Chon-ne as a semi-independent kingdom from the early 15th century for 23 generations, until 1928, when it was placed under the control of the Lanchow government.
Thus many good families are impoverished and disgraced by these pert sluts, who, taking the advantage of a young man's simplicity and unruly desires, draw many heedless youths, nay, some of good estates, into their snares; and of this we have but too many instances.
Unruly receiver Terry Glenn, making his first start of the season after being benched for the opening four games, caught a 21-yard score from Tom Brady and had seven catches for 110 yards total. The Patriots led 16–13 but were struggling on special teams (Bill Belichick called their performance "the worst in a year and a half" afterward); Adam Vinatieri had missed a field goal try and the extra point off Glenn's touchdown, but the real special teams breakdown occurred with less than seven minutes remaining; forced to punt with his team trailing 19–16, Patriots punter Lee Johnson botched the kick and running back Derrick Harris ran in a six-yard score (the miscue cost Johnson his punting job as he was replaced by Ken Walter).
Upset, Ste begins drinking and is kicked out of the Dog for unruly behaviour.

More Vocab Words

::: melee - fight
::: nurture - nourish; feed; educate; rear; care for while it is growing or developing; foster; cultivate; N: something that nourishes; rearing
::: perjury - false testimony while under oath; V. perjure oneself: testify falsely under oath
::: earmark - set aside (money or time) for a particular purpose
::: importunate - urging; always demanding; troublesomely urgent or persistent
::: sleight - dexterity; CF. sleight of hand: legerdemain; quickness of the hands in doing tricks
::: incarcerate - imprison
::: fashion - give shape to; make; Ex. fashion the pot out of clay
::: serrated - having a sawtoothed edge; Ex. serrated leaf
::: prance - move about in a spirited manner (proudly and confidently)