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Vocabulary Word

Word: ungainly

Definition: (of someone) awkward in movement; clumsy; (of something) unwieldy; Ex. ungainly dancer/instrument


Sentences Containing 'ungainly'

'At any rate,' observed Uriah, with a writhe of his ungainly person, 'we may keep the door shut.
'Thank you, Miss Trotwood,' said Uriah, writhing in his ungainly manner, 'for your good opinion!
How surprised must the fishes be to see this ungainly visitor from another sphere speeding his way amid their schools!
In contrast with this positive assessment, the novel is seen by Călinescu as a mediocre accomplishment, inspired by but inferior to the fantasy prose of Tudor Arghezi, "aiming into the empty air" with "ungainly wit."
It moves with a slow ungainly walk or short jumps and has greyish brown skin covered with wart-like lumps.
It replaced a previous building, also a convention center, regarded as "ungainly".
It was a sight to see the figure Don Quixote made, long, lank, lean, and yellow, his garments clinging tight to him, ungainly, and above all anything but agile.
Its back was corrugated and ornamented with ungainly bosses, and a greenish incrustation blotched it here and there.
Its evil eyes were wriggling on their stalks, its mouth was all alive with appetite, and its vast ungainly claws, smeared with an algal slime, were descending upon me.
Roger Ebert also praised Guy's performance, but overall found the film wanting, writing: "the film as a whole is amateurish and ungainly, can't find a consistent tone, is too long, ... and is photographed with too many beauty shots that slow the progress."
Similar to German or Dutch, very long, and quite impractical, examples like "produktionsstyrningssystemsprogramvaruuppdatering" ("production controller system software update") are possible, but it is seldom this ungainly, at least in spoken Swedish and outside of technical writing.
This whale is not dead; he is only dispirited; out of sorts, perhaps; hypochondriac; and so supine, that the hinges of his jaw have relaxed, leaving him there in that ungainly sort of plight, a reproach to all his tribe, who must, no doubt, imprecate lock-jaws upon him.
Tyson believed that a bouncer should 'pin the batsman against the sightscreen' and frequently used them to intimidate batsmen, even tailenders His ungainly action and quest for raw speed took a toll on even his strong body and he suffered from a series of injuries which brought a premature end to his career.
Vice Admiral Sir Richard Grindall KCB (1750 – 23 May 1820) was an officer in the British Royal Navy whose distinguished career during the American War of Independence, the French Revolutionary War and the Napoleonic Wars was highlighted by his presence at the battle of Trafalgar in 1805, Despite being slow and ungainly, his 98-gun ship was instrumental in the final stages of the battle and especially in the chaotic storm which followed, when many of the British fleet would have been lost but for the efforts of Grindall and other captains of largely undamaged ships.
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