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Vocabulary Word

Word: tumult

Definition: commotion of a great crowd; riot; noise; uproar; ADJ. tumultuous: noisy and disorderly


Sentences Containing 'tumult'

Everywhere was tumult, exultation, deafening and maniacal bewilderment, astounding noise, yet furious dumb show.
All around outside, too, it beat the walls with a deep, hoarse roar, from which, occasionally, some partial shouts of tumult broke and leaped into the air like spray.
The astonishment of the ladies was just what he wished; that of Mrs. Bennet perhaps surpassing the rest; though, when the first tumult of joy was over, she began to declare that it was what she had expected all the while.
The tumult of her mind, was now painfully great.
The tumult of Elizabeth's mind was allayed by this conversation.
Suddenly the tumult ceased, as if by magic, and the doors of the church opened.
At this moment my mother seized me in her arms, and hurrying noiselessly along numerous turnings and windings known only to ourselves, she arrived at a private staircase of the kiosk, where was a scene of frightful tumult and confusion.
In the midst of all this frightful tumult and these terrific cries, two reports, fearfully distinct, followed by two shrieks more heartrending than all, froze me with terror.
In proportion as her memory became clearer, the occurrences of the evening were revealed in their true light; what she had taken for confusion was a tumult; what she had regarded as something distressing, was in reality a disgrace.
In the midst of this tumult the voice of the president was heard to exclaim,``Are you playing with justice, accused, and do you dare set your fellow citizens an example of disorder which even in these times has never been equalled?''
There was an energy, a conviction, and a sincerity in the manner of the young man, which silenced the tumult.
Many people have been assassinated in a tumult, but even criminals have rarely been insulted during trial.
Where the security of the magistrate, though supported by the principal people of the country, is endangered by every popular discontent; where a small tumult is capable of bringing about in a few hours a great revolution, the whole authority of government must be employed to suppress and punish every murmur and complaint against it.
It has never, accordingly, been the occasion of any tumult or civil commotion in any country in which it has once been established.
In so extensive a country as Scotland, however, a tumult in a remote parish was not so likely to give disturbance to government as in a smaller state.
One, that the things or objects themselves reach not unto the soul, but stand without still and quiet, and that it is from the opinion only which is within, that all the tumult and all the trouble doth proceed.
Here then likewise remember, that every duty that belongs unto a man doth consist of some certain letters or numbers as it were, to which without any noise or tumult keeping thyself thou must orderly proceed to thy proposed end, forbearing to quarrel with him that would quarrel and fall out with thee.
Horsemen he had none, neither before nor behind his chariot: as it seemeth, to avoid all tumult and trouble.
So from one to another they will go proclaiming his achievements; and presently at the tumult of the boys and the others the king of that kingdom will appear at the windows of his royal palace, and as soon as he beholds the knight, recognising him by his arms and the device on his shield, he will as a matter of course say, 'What ho!
In addition to all this commotion, there came a further disturbance to increase the tumult, for now it seemed as if in truth, on all four sides of the wood, four encounters or battles were going on at the same time; in one quarter resounded the dull noise of a terrible cannonade, in another numberless muskets were being discharged, the shouts of the combatants sounded almost close at hand, and farther away the Moorish lelilies were raised again and again.
To enter upon them without a light was to put them into a tumult of apprehension.
I found myself in the same grey light and tumult I have already described.
The howl and roar, the rattling of the doors and windows, the rumbling in the chimneys, the apparent rocking of the very house that sheltered me, and the prodigious tumult of the sea, were more fearful than in the morning.
Something within me, faintly answering to the storm without, tossed up the depths of my memory and made a tumult in them.
They carried him through the wild roar, a hush in the midst of all the tumult; and took him to the cottage where Death was already.
But now when the boatswain calls all hands to lighten her; when boxes, bales, and jars are clattering overboard; when the wind is shrieking, and the men are yelling, and every plank thunders with trampling feet right over Jonah's head; in all this raging tumult, Jonah sleeps his hideous sleep.
Ever since the blow, he had lain in his berth; but that morning, hearing the tumult on the deck, he had crept out, and thus far had watched the whole scene.

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