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Vocabulary Word

Word: subservient

Definition: behaving like a slave; servile; obsequious; subordinate; N. subservience


Sentences Containing 'subservient'

It was at this period I learned that the destiny which seemed subservient to every wish formed by Napoleon, had bestowed on him a son, named king of Rome even in his cradle.
God only knows that I retire from thee without pride or hatred, but not without many regrets; he only knows that the power confided to me has never been made subservient to my personal good or to any useless cause.
The weavers of linen and hempen cloth, the principal manufactures of the country, as well as all other artificers subservient to them, wheel-makers, reel-makers, etc.
The banks of Venice, Genoa, Amsterdam, Hamburg, and Nuremberg, seem to have been all originally established with this view, though some of them may have afterwards been made subservient to other purposes.
Trade, or buying in order to sell again, they still consider as their principal business, and by a strange absurdity, regard the character of the sovereign as but an appendix to that of the merchant; as something which ought to be made subservient to it, or by means of which they may be enabled to buy cheaper in India, and thereby to sell with a better profit in Europe.
It tends to make government subservient to the interest of monopoly, and consequently to stunt the natural growth of some parts, at least, of the surplus produce of the country, to what is barely sufficient for answering the demand of the company.
But in the universities of Europe, where philosophy was taught only as subservient to theology, it was natural to dwell longer upon these two chapters than upon any other of the science.
In that philosophy, the duties of human life were treated of as subservient to the happiness and perfection of human life, But when moral, as well as natural philosophy, came to be taught only as subservient to theology, the duties of human life were treated of as chiefly subservient to the happiness of a life to come.
You would come to me and say: "Epictetus, we can no longer endure being chained to this wretched body, giving food and drink and rest and purification: aye, and for its sake forced to be subservient to this man and that.
He received my proposition with more compliance than is usual among writers, especially those of the projecting species, professing “he would be glad to receive further information.” I told him, “that in the kingdom of Tribnia, {454a} by the natives called Langdon, {454b} where I had sojourned some time in my travels, the bulk of the people consist in a manner wholly of discoverers, witnesses, informers, accusers, prosecutors, evidences, swearers, together with their several subservient and subaltern instruments, all under the colours, the conduct, and the pay of ministers of state, and their deputies.
But a wise prince would rather choose to employ those who practise the last of these methods; because such zealots prove always the most obsequious and subservient to the will and passions of their master.
There now's a patched professor in Queen Nature's granite-founded College; but methinks he's too subservient.

More Vocab Words

::: obviate - make unnecessary; get rid of; Ex. obviate the need
::: disgruntle - make discontented
::: hallowed - blessed; consecrated; Ex. hallowed ground; V. hallow: set apart as holy
::: advert - refer
::: vouchsafe - grant condescendingly; guarantee; Ex. vouchsafe your fair return on your investment
::: fusion - union; coalition; V. fuse
::: tact - skill or sensitivity in dealing with people without causing offence
::: impinge - infringe; encroach; influence; touch; collide with; Ex. The effects are impinging on every aspect of our lives.
::: comatose - in a coma; extremely sleepy
::: inroad - hostile invasion; advance that lessens the quantity or difficulty of something; Ex. The long illness made serious inroads on his savings; CF. raid