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Vocabulary Word

Word: stoic

Definition: stoical; impassive; unmoved by joy or grief; N. CF. stoicism


Sentences Containing 'stoic'

In his regiment Maximilian Morrel was noted for his rigid observance, not only of the obligations imposed on a soldier, but also of the duties of a man; and he thus gained the name of``the stoic.''
The Athenians sent Carneades the academic, and Diogenes the stoic, upon a solemn embassy to Rome; and though their city had then declined from its former grandeur, it was still an independent and considerable republic.
The ablest teachers were engaged for him, and he was trained in the strict doctrine of the Stoic philosophy, which was his great delight.
With Epicureanism we have nothing to do now; but it will be worth while to sketch the history and tenets of the Stoic sect.
The Stoic system of physics was materialism with an infusion of pantheism.
The highest good of man is consciously to work with God for the common good, and this is the sense in which the Stoic tried to live in accord with nature.
Carrying this theory to its extreme, the Stoic said that there could be no gradations between virtue and vice, though of course each has its special manifestations.
It is probable that no Stoic claimed for himself that he was this Wise Man, but that each strove after it as an ideal much as the Christian strives after a likeness to Christ.
The Stoic was called upon to control his desires and affections, and to guide his opinion; to bring his whole being under the sway of the will or leading principle, just as the universe is guided and governed by divine Providence.
The uncompromising stiffness of Zeno or Chrysippus is softened and transformed by passing through a nature reverent and tolerant, gentle and free from guile; the grim resignation which made life possible to the Stoic sage becomes in him almost a mood of aspiration.
His gods are better than the Stoic gods, who sit aloof from all human things, untroubled and uncaring, but his personal hope is hardly stronger.
From Apollonius, true liberty, and unvariable steadfastness, and not to regard anything at all, though never so little, but right and reason: and always, whether in the sharpest pains, or after the loss of a child, or in long diseases, to be still the same man; who also was a present and visible example unto me, that it was possible for the same man to be both vehement and remiss: a man not subject to be vexed, and offended with the incapacity of his scholars and auditors in his lectures and expositions; and a true pattern of a man who of all his good gifts and faculties, least esteemed in himself, that his excellent skill and ability to teach and persuade others the common theorems and maxims of the Stoic philosophy.
A man without ever the least appearance of anger, or any other passion; able at the same time most exactly to observe the Stoic Apathia, or unpassionateness, and yet to be most tender-hearted: ever of good credit; and yet almost without any noise, or rumour: very learned, and yet making little show.
A Stoic or Epicurean displays principles, which may not be durable, but which have an effect on conduct and behaviour.
This Right Whale I take to have been a Stoic; the Sperm Whale, a Platonian, who might have taken up Spinoza in his latter years.

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::: retinue - following; attendants
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::: macabre - gruesome; grisly; ghastly; CF. of death
::: unconscionable - unscrupulous; not guided by conscience; excessive; beyond reason; Ex. unconscionable demand
::: bacchanalian - drunken
::: narrative - related to telling a story; N: narrated account; story; V. narrate: tell (a story); CF. narration
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::: plane - carpenter's tool for smoothing and leveling wood; V. CF. flat