Vocabulary Builder

Vocabulary Builder

    Improve Your Writing

  • Boost your vocabulary
  • See words in the context of real sentences
  • Learn by association and by definition
  • Master a new lexicon!

Get Started Below

Vocabulary Word

Word: robust

Definition: strong; vigorous


Sentences Containing 'robust'

Man was not made so large limbed and robust but that he must seek to narrow his world and wall in a space such as fitted him.
A robust poor man, one sunny day here in Concord, praised a fellow townsman to me, because, as he said, he was kind to the poor; meaning himself.
She was probably the only thoroughly sound conditioned, healthy, and robust young lady that ever walked the globe, and wherever she came it was spring.
I take nineteen alligators and a bar`l of whiskey for breakfast when I'm in robust health, and a bushel of rattlesnakes and a dead body when I'm ailing!
One would not imagine that jokers of this robust breed would be sensitive but they were.
His operations were followed by complete success; but the troubles of late years had been too much for his constitution, at no time robust, and on March 17, 180, he died in Pannonia.
The man was of a robust and well-proportioned frame, in age a little over forty, rather swarthy in complexion, with long moustaches and a full beard, and, in short, his appearance was such that if he had been well dressed he would have been taken for a person of quality and good birth.
Then another cart came by at the same pace, but the occupant of the throne was not old like the others, but a man stalwart and robust, and of a forbidding countenance, who as he came up said in a voice far hoarser and more devilish, "I am the enchanter Archelaus, the mortal enemy of Amadis of Gaul and all his kindred," and then passed on.
How requisite such kind of treatment was to philosophy, in her early youth, will easily be conceived, if we reflect, that, even at present, when she may be supposed more hardy and robust, she bears with much difficulty the inclemency of the seasons, and those harsh winds of calumny and persecution, which blow upon her.
Annie, my dear, I am sure you must perfectly recollect that your cousin never was strong--not what can be called ROBUST, you know,' said Mrs. Markleham, with emphasis, and looking round upon us generally, '--from the time when my daughter and himself were children together, and walking about, arm-in-arm, the livelong day.'
For a long time, though studying and working patiently, I had accustomed myself to robust exercise.
When our first emotion was over, and he sat before the fire with the children on his knees, and the blaze shining on his face, he looked, to me, as vigorous and robust, withal as handsome, an old man, as ever I had seen.
Thus the young ladies are as much ashamed of being cowards and fools as the men, and despise all personal ornaments, beyond decency and cleanliness: neither did I perceive any difference in their education made by their difference of sex, only that the exercises of the females were not altogether so robust; and that some rules were given them relating to domestic life, and a smaller compass of learning was enjoined them: for their maxim is, that among peoples of quality, a wife should be always a reasonable and agreeable companion, because she cannot always be young.
This writer went through all the usual topics of European moralists, showing “how diminutive, contemptible, and helpless an animal was man in his own nature; how unable to defend himself from inclemencies of the air, or the fury of wild beasts: how much he was excelled by one creature in strength, by another in speed, by a third in foresight, by a fourth in industry.” He added, “that nature was degenerated in these latter declining ages of the world, and could now produce only small abortive births, in comparison of those in ancient times.” He said “it was very reasonable to think, not only that the species of men were originally much larger, but also that there must have been giants in former ages; which, as it is asserted by history and tradition, so it has been confirmed by huge bones and skulls, casually dug up in several parts of the kingdom, far exceeding the common dwindled race of men in our days.” He argued, “that the very laws of nature absolutely required we should have been made, in the beginning of a size more large and robust; not so liable to destruction from every little accident, of a tile falling from a house, or a stone cast from the hand of a boy, or being drowned in a little brook.” From this way of reasoning, the author drew several moral applications, useful in the conduct of life, but needless here to repeat.
That a weak diseased body, a meagre countenance, and sallow complexion, are the true marks of noble blood; and a healthy robust appearance is so disgraceful in a man of quality, that the world concludes his real father to have been a groom or a coachman.
Why is almost every robust healthy boy with a robust healthy soul in him, at some time or other crazy to go to sea?
The firmaments of air and sea were hardly separable in that all-pervading azure; only, the pensive air was transparently pure and soft, with a woman's look, and the robust and man-like sea heaved with long, strong, lingering swells, as Samson's chest in his sleep.

More Vocab Words

::: perspicuity - clearness of expression; freedom from ambiguity
::: welter - wallow (as in mud or high seas); lie soaked (as in blood); Ex. The victims weltered in their blood.
::: premeditate - plan in advance; Ex. premeditated murder
::: vicarious - experienced as if one were taking part in the experience of another; done by a deputy for other people; acting as a substitute; Ex. vicarious thrill at the movies; Ex. the vicarious sufferings of Christ
::: unwitting - not knowing; unaware; unintentional; Ex. She was their unwitting accomplice; Ex. unwitting insult; CF. wit: know
::: repercussion - rebound; reaction; reverberation; Ex. serious repercussion
::: carnage - destruction of life; slaughter; killing of large numbers of people or animals
::: foppish - vain about dress and appearance; N. fop: man who takes too much interest in his clothes and appearance
::: cerebral - pertaining to the brain or intellect; intellectual rather than emotional; CF. cerebrum
::: slink - move furtively; ADJ. slinky: stealthy; furtive; sneaky (as in ambush)