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Vocabulary Word

Word: rigid

Definition: hard and unbending; stiff and unyielding; fixed in behavior or views; strict; rigorous; Ex. rigid rule


Sentences Containing 'rigid'

For this reason a rigid test in color is given to all persons seeking such employment, and the ability to match ribbons and yarns of all ordinary hues is an unvarying requirement for efficiency.
Not wanting it in the landscape, he has boldly made the contor of the seated female conform to a rigid straight line, accentuated still further by the flute in her hand.
For this reason: It was a rigid rule of the association that its members should never, under any circumstances whatever, give information about the channel to any`outsider.'
On the street corners, and in the squares, lay sick men, suddenly overtaken by the disease; and even corpses, distorted and rigid.
There were thirty six corpses of adults in sight, stretched on their backs on slightly slanted boards, in three long rows all of them with wax white, rigid faces, and all of them wrapped in white shrouds.
I used to wander among those rigid corpses, and peer into their austere faces, by the hour.
There was an occasional alligator swimming comfortably along in the canal, and an occasional picturesque colored person on the bank, flinging his statue rigid reflection upon the still water and watching for a bite.
The crisis was terrible, and a rigid form with twisted limbs, swollen eyelids, and lips flecked with bloody foam, lay on the bed of torture, in place of the intellectual being who so lately rested there.
In his regiment Maximilian Morrel was noted for his rigid observance, not only of the obligations imposed on a soldier, but also of the duties of a man; and he thus gained the name of``the stoic.''
``Who enjoyed the reputation of being the most severe, the most upright, the most rigid magistrate on the bench?''
His drawing room, under the regenerating influence of a young wife and a daughter by his first marriage, scarcely eighteen, was still one of the well regulated Paris salons where the worship of traditional customs and the observance of rigid etiquette were carefully maintained.
He spoke in a voice of the procureur general, with the rigid inflexibility of neck and shoulders which caused his flatterers to say -LRB- as we have before observed -RRB- that he was the living statue of the law.
True, the planks were not so closely adjusted but that a hasty peep might be obtained through their interstices; but the strict decorum and rigid propriety of the inhabitants of the house left no grounds for apprehending that advantage would be taken of that circumstance.
Certainly a call to the visitors'room had scarcely astonished Andrea less than themselves, for the wily youth, instead of making use of his privilege of waiting to be claimed on his entry into La Force, had maintained a rigid silence.
Moreover how all acclamations and flattery were repressed by him: how carefully he observed all things necessary to the government, and kept an account of the common expenses, and how patiently he did abide that he was reprehended by some for this his strict and rigid kind of dealing.
The cause of the original variability of these characters is not manifest; but we can see why they should not have been rendered as constant and uniform as others, for they are accumulated by sexual selection, which is less rigid in its action than ordinary selection, as it does not entail death, but only gives fewer offspring to the less favoured males.
All being mainly due to the species of the same group being the descendants of a common progenitor, from whom they have inherited much in common, to parts which have recently and largely varied being more likely still to go on varying than parts which have long been inherited and have not varied, to natural selection having more or less completely, according to the lapse of time, overmastered the tendency to reversion and to further variability, to sexual selection being less rigid than ordinary selection, and to variations in the same parts having been accumulated by natural and sexual selection, and thus having been adapted for secondary sexual, and for ordinary purposes.
Janet had gone away to get the bath ready, when my aunt, to my great alarm, became in one moment rigid with indignation, and had hardly voice to cry out, 'Janet!
His chin was cocked upward and his eyes were fixed in a dreadful, rigid stare at the corner of the ceiling.
Lord St. Simon had by no means relaxed his rigid attitude, but had listened with a frowning brow and a compressed lip to this long narrative.
Dora bent her head over her drawing and said, after a little while--I had sat, in the interval, in a burning fever, and with my legs in a very rigid state-- 'You didn't seem to be sensible of that happiness yourself, at one time of the day.'
Miss Murdstone gave me her chilly finger-nails, and sat severely rigid.
Always proceeding from a rigid mouth and closed teeth, as if the jaw were locked and the face frozen up in pain.
Motionless, rigid, staring; moaning in the same dumb way from time to time, with the same helpless motion of the head; but giving no other sign of life.
Old as Pizarro, this whiteness keeps her ruins for ever new; admits not the cheerful greenness of complete decay; spreads over her broken ramparts the rigid pallor of an apoplexy that fixes its own distortions.
But ere the first wild alarm could get out abroad among the crew, the old man with a rigid laugh exclaimed, "I have it!
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More Vocab Words

::: infiltrate - pass into or through; penetrate or enter (an organization) sneakily; Ex. infiltrate the troops into enemy territory; CF. infiltrator
::: personable - attractive (in personality or appearance)
::: pending - not yet decided or settled; impending; Ex. pending decision; PREP. while awaiting; until; Ex. delay the decision pending his return
::: bauble - trinket; cheap jewel; trifle
::: stalemate - deadlock; situation in which further action is blocked
::: receptive - quick or willing to receive (ideas, suggestions, etc.); Ex. receptive to the proposal
::: penitent - repentant; N.
::: contortions - twistings; distortions; V. contort: twist violently out of shape; CF. contortionist
::: agape - openmouthed
::: encumber - burden; N. encumbrance