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Vocabulary Word

Word: retain

Definition: keep; maintain possession of; employ (esp. a lawyer or advisor); N. retainer: servant; fee paid to retain an advisor


Sentences Containing 'retain'

I well understand that, even if Miss Manette held me at this moment in her innocent heart do not think I have the presumption to assume so much I could retain no place in it against her love for her father.''
They reject the oxygen, which passes back to the air, but they retain the carbon, which becomes a part of the plant structure.
Man's knowledge of chemicals and their effect on each other has enabled him to overcome this difficulty and, at the same time, to retain the leavening effect of the baking soda.
Silk, lace, and wool when bleached with chlorine become hard and brittle, but when whitened with sulphurous acid, they retain their natural characteristics.
Materials which are not exposed directly to an intense and prolonged illumination retain their whiteness for a long time, and hence dress materials and hats which have been bleached with sulphurous acid should be protected from the sun's glare when not in use.
So that Titian, having to retain the vertical position for Bacchus'forward leg, used the aggressive standing leg of the cymbal lady to accentuate its spring and lightness.
The printing consists in inking the plate all over and wiping off until only the lines retain any ink, when the plate is put in a press and an impression taken.
By proper Shelter and Clothing we legitimately retain our own internal heat; but with an excess of these, or of Fuel, that is, with an external heat greater than our own internal, may not cookery properly be said to begin?
It is an interesting question how far men would retain their relative rank if they were divested of their clothes.
I learned from my two years'experience that it would cost incredibly little trouble to obtain one's necessary food, even in this latitude; that a man may use as simple a diet as the animals, and yet retain health and strength.
As the Orientals say,``A cur's tail may be warmed, and pressed, and bound round with ligatures, and after a twelve years'labor bestowed upon it, still it will retain its natural form.''
Sometimes, however, he will run upon a wall many rods, and then leap off far to one side, and he appears to know that water will not retain his scent.
If we were left solely to the wordy wit of legislators in Congress for our guidance, uncorrected by the seasonable experience and the effectual complaints of the people, America would not long retain her rank among the nations.
The world and the books are so accustomed to use, and over use, the word`new'in connection with our country, that we early get and permanently retain the impression that there is nothing old about it.
Seeing that alone retain animation, he eyed it for some time with fear and surprise.
In the court he found Penelon, who, with a rouleau of a hundred francs in either hand, seemed unable to make up his mind to retain them.
Albert seized it, and as Franz had no reason to suppose it was meant for him, he suffered Albert to retain it.
Although Generald'Epinay served under Napoleon, did he not still retain royalist sentiments?
It is the insect with black claws, and the awful word which I wish to retain in my imagination in all its purity and all its importance.''
If the lemonade be pure and inoffensive, the syrup will retain its color; if, on the contrary, the lemonade be drugged with poison, the syrup will become green.
``Tell me, may I shake hands with you, saying,`Beauchamp, acknowledge you have injured me, and retain my friendship,'or must I simply propose to you a choice of arms?''
Oh, I entreat you, my son, if you had entertained such an idea, dispel it; and my counsel to you nay, my prayer is to retain his friendship.''
During the late war, the Dutch gained the whole carrying trade of France, of which they still retain a very large share.
The country which has this price to pay, will never belong without the quantity of those metals which it has occasion for; and no country will ever long retain a quantity which it has no occasion for.
The people did not long retain their right of election; and while they did retain it, they almost always acted under the influence of the clergy, who, in such spiritual matters, appeared to be their natural guides.
In order to get back this greater capital, together with the ordinary profits of stock, it would be necessary that he should retain a larger portion, or, what comes to the same thing, the price of a larger portion, of the produce of the land, and, consequently, that he should pay less rent to the landlord.
And as concerning pain, that that which is intolerable is soon ended by death; and that which holds long must needs be tolerable; and that the mind in the meantime (which is all in all) may by way of interclusion, or interception, by stopping all manner of commerce and sympathy with the body, still retain its own tranquillity.
For what in either of these or the like cases should hinder the mind to retain her own rest and tranquillity, consisting both in the right judgment of those things that happen unto her, and in the ready use of all present matters and occasions?
Pedunculated cirripedes have two minute folds of skin, called by me the ovigerous frena, which serve, through the means of a sticky secretion, to retain the eggs until they are hatched within the sack.
The pollen-mass of the male plant (for the sexes are separate in this orchid) is thus carried to the flower of the female plant, where it is brought into contact with the stigma, which is viscid enough to break certain elastic threads, and retain the pollen, thus effecting fertilisation.
The Pleuronectidae, while very young and still symmetrical, with their eyes standing on opposite sides of the head, cannot long retain a vertical position, owing to the excessive depth of their bodies, the small size of their lateral fins, and to their being destitute of a swim-bladder.
In these two latter classes the stems have generally, but not always, lost the power of twining, though they retain the power of revolving, which the tendrils likewise possess.
Hence it is by no means surprising that one species should retain the same identical form much longer than others; or, if changing, should change in a less degree.
Therefore it is quite possible, as we have seen in the case of some Silurian forms, that a species might go on being slightly modified in relation to its slightly altered conditions of life, and yet retain throughout a vast period the same general characteristics.
It should be observed that scarcely any means of transport would carry seeds for very great distances; for seeds do not retain their vitality when exposed for a great length of time to the action of sea water; nor could they be long carried in the crops or intestines of birds.
Thus fishes still alive are not very rarely dropped at distant points by whirlwinds; and it is known that the ova retain their vitality for a considerable time after removal from the water.
Herons and other birds, century after century, have gone on daily devouring fish; they then take flight and go to other waters, or are blown across the sea; and we have seen that seeds retain their power of germination, when rejected many hours afterwards in pellets or in the excrement.
Some species, however, might spread and yet retain the same character throughout the group, just as we see some species spreading widely throughout a continent and remaining the same.
Consequently such parts, being already present in considerable numbers, and being highly variable, would naturally afford the materials for adaptation to the most different purposes; yet they would generally retain, through the force of inheritance, plain traces of their original or fundamental resemblance.
They would retain this resemblance all the more, as the variations, which afforded the basis for their subsequent modification through natural selection, would tend from the first to be similar; the parts being at an early stage of growth alike, and being subjected to nearly the same conditions.
Rudimentary organs sometimes retain their potentiality: this occasionally occurs with the mammae of male mammals, which have been known to become well developed and to secrete milk.
They then went on with their game, knocking other books about; and I, having heard them mention the name of Don Quixote whom I love and adore so, took care to retain this vision in my memory."
Though there never were a circle or triangle in nature, the truths demonstrated by Euclid would for ever retain their certainty and evidence.
The year '87 furnished us with a long series of cases of greater or less interest, of which I retain the records.
Its finder has carried it off, therefore, to fulfil the ultimate destiny of a goose, while I continue to retain the hat of the unknown gentleman who lost his Christmas dinner."
As he loved his cousin, however, there was an excellent explanation why he should retain her secret--the more so as the secret was a disgraceful one.
But these two harpoons, each by its own cord, are both connected with the line; the object being this: to dart them both, if possible, one instantly after the other into the same whale; so that if, in the coming drag, one should draw out, the other may still retain a hold.
Into this hole, the end of the second alternating great tackle is then hooked so as to retain a hold upon the blubber, in order to prepare for what follows.
Like the great dome of St. Peter's, and like the great whale, retain, O man!
If we were left solely to the wordy wit of legislators in Congress for our guidance, uncorrected by the seasonable experience and the effectual complaints of the people, America would not long retain her rank among the nations.

More Vocab Words

::: tarnish - make or become dull or discolored; N.
::: gestate - evolve as in prenatal growth; N. gestation: period of development from conception until birth
::: orthodox - traditional; (of someone) conservative in belief; adhering to an established doctrine
::: conducive - helpful; contributive; V. conduce; Ex. conduce to/towards
::: aperture - opening; hole; adjustable opening in a camera that limits the amount of light
::: regatta - boat or yacht race
::: cynical - skeptical or distrustful of human motives; N. cynicism; CF. cynic: person who believes all people are motivated by selfishness
::: asymmetric - not identical on both sides of a dividing central line
::: piety - devoutness; reverence for God; ADJ. pious
::: salvage - rescue (goods or property) from loss; N: saving; property saved