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Vocabulary Word

Word: requisite

Definition: necessary requirement; something required; ADJ: required; necessary


Sentences Containing 'requisite'

In addition, the user is not confined to the laundry, but is free to seek the coolest part of the house, the only requisite being an electrical connection.
It may be set back a short distance from the revetted bank; but it is, in effect, the requisite parapet.
``This one is built against the solid rock, and it would take ten experienced miners, duly furnished with the requisite tools, as many years to perforate it.
This same person, with almost incredible patience and perseverance, had contrived to provide himself with tools requisite for so unparalleled an attempt.
We shall save you another time, as we have done this, only with a better chance of success, because we shall be able to command every requisite assistance.''
``Still,''said the governor,``I believe it will be requisite, notwithstanding your certainty, and not that I doubt your science, but in discharge of my official duty, that we should be perfectly assured that the prisoner is dead.''
``They have been all hired this fortnight, and there are none left but those absolutely requisite for posting.''
Make the requisite inquiries for a place of this description, and when you have met with an eligible spot, visit it, and if it possess the advantages desired, purchase it at once in your own name.
Illness of body would not affect the validity of the deed, but sanity of mind is absolutely requisite.''
This woman gave all the requisite particulars, and it was intrusted to her.''
The house was ready, and the sloop which had arrived a week before lay at anchor in a small creek with her crew of six men, who had observed all the requisite formalities and were ready again to put to sea.
As Bertuccio was leaving the room to give the requisite orders, Baptistin opened the door: he held a letter on a silver waiter.
From the same drawer she took a man's complete costume, from the boots to the coat, and a provision of linen, where there was nothing superfluous, but every requisite.
``Needless delays but increase the grief of parting,''said Monte Cristo,``and Maximilian has doubtless provided himself with everything requisite; at least, I advised him to do so.''
To say nothing of such complicated machines as the ship of the sailor, the mill of the fuller, or even the loom of the weaver, let us consider only what a variety of labour is requisite in order to form that very simple machine, the shears with which the shepherd clips the wool.
By means of those operations, the princes and sovereign states which performed them were enabled, in appearance, to pay their debts and fulfil their engagements with a smaller quantity of silver than would otherwise have been requisite.
If the reward should at any time be less than what was requisite for this purpose, the deficiency of hands would soon raise it; and if it should at any time be more, their excessive multiplication would soon lower it to this necessary rate.
The demand for labour, according as it happens to be increasing, stationary, or declining, or to require an increasing, stationary, or declining population, determines the quantities of the necessaries and conveniencies of life which must be given to the labourer; and the money price of labour is determined by what is requisite for purchasing this quantity.
It is only in places of the most extensive commerce and correspondence that the intelligence requisite for it can be had.
To have served an apprenticeship in the town, under a master properly qualified, is commonly the necessary requisite for obtaining this freedom.
In order to erect a corporation, no other authority in ancient times was requisite, in many parts of Europe, but that of the town-corporate in which it was established.
The time and study, the genius, knowledge, and application requisite to qualify an eminent teacher of the sciences, are at least equal to what is necessary for the greatest practitioners in law and physic.
The same extent of ground not only maintains a greater number of cattle, but as they we brought within a smaller compass, less labour becomes requisite to tend them, and to collect their produce.
But it will generally be impossible to supply the great and extended market, without employing a quantity of labour greater than in proportion to what had been requisite for supplying the narrow and confined one.
In order to put industry into motion, three things are requisite; materials to work upon, tools to work with, and the wages or recompence for the sake of which the work is done.
The capital of the country would be the same, though a greater number of pieces might be requisite for conveying any equal portion of it from one hand to another.
When the establishment of law and order afforded him this leisure, he often wanted the inclination, and almost always the requisite abilities.
Independent of this necessity, he is, in such a situation, naturally disposed to the parsimony requisite for accumulation.
In order to vote upon this qualification, too, it was declared necessary, that he should have possessed it, if acquired by his own purchase, and not by inheritance, for at least one year, instead of six months, the term requisite before.
No discipline is ever requisite to force attendance upon lectures which are really worth the attending, as is well known wherever any such lectures are given.
The knowledge of those two languages, therefore, not being indispensably requisite to a churchman, the study of them did not for along time make a necessary part of the common course of university education.
But where every citizen had the spirit of a soldier, a smaller standing army would surely be requisite.
Among nations, to whom commerce and manufacture are little known, the sovereign, it has already been observed in the Fourth book, is in a situation which naturally disposes him to the parsimony requisite for accumulation.
Few would readily believe in the natural capacity and years of practice requisite to become even a skilful pigeon-fancier.
In many cases complex and long-enduring conditions, often of a peculiar nature, are necessary for the development of a structure; and the requisite conditions may seldom have concurred.
Mere size, on the contrary, would in some cases determine, as has been remarked by Owen, quicker extermination, from the greater amount of requisite food.
Some additional explanation is here requisite which I cannot give.
How painful soever this inward search or enquiry may appear, it becomes, in some measure, requisite to those, who would describe with success the obvious and outward appearances of life and manners.
The other species want a name in our language, and in most others; I suppose, because it was not requisite for any, but philosophical purposes, to rank them under a general term or appellation.
For this reason it may be requisite to venture upon a more difficult task; and enumerating all the branches of human knowledge, endeavour to show that none of them can afford such an argument.
The principal difficulty in the mathematics is the length of inferences and compass of thought, requisite to the forming of any conclusion.
And, perhaps, our progress in natural philosophy is chiefly retarded by the want of proper experiments and phaenomena, which are often discovered by chance, and cannot always be found, when requisite, even by the most diligent and prudent enquiry.
Whatever definition we may give of liberty, we should be careful to observe two requisite circumstances; _first,_ that it be consistent with plain matter of fact; _secondly,_ that it be consistent with itself.
The raising of a feather, when the wind wants ever so little of a force requisite for that purpose, is as real a miracle, though not so sensible with regard to us.
He considered justly, that it was not requisite, in order to reject a fact of this nature, to be able accurately to disprove the testimony, and to trace its falsehood, through all the circumstances of knavery and credulity which produced it.
Such qualities must be somewhat beyond what is merely requisite for producing the effect, which we examine.
You are no stranger to the fact, that there have been periods of my life, when it has been requisite that I should pause, until certain expected events should turn up; when it has been necessary that I should fall back, before making what I trust I shall not be accused of presumption in terming--a spring.
'Really,' interrupted Mrs. Markleham, 'if I have any discretion at all--' ('Which you haven't, you Marplot,' observed my aunt, in an indignant whisper.) --'I must be permitted to observe that it cannot be requisite to enter into these details.'
The proposition I originally submitted, was twelve, eighteen, and twenty-four; but I am apprehensive that such an arrangement might not allow sufficient time for the requisite amount of--Something--to turn up.
Therefore the room where company meet who practise this art, is full of all things, ready at hand, requisite to furnish matter for this kind of artificial converse.

More Vocab Words

::: chase - ornament a metal surface by indenting; follow rapidly to catch
::: malfeasance - wrongdoing; misconduct (by a public official)
::: resumption - taking up again; recommencement; V. resume: begin or take up again; take or occupy again; Ex. Kindly resume your seats.
::: ingenuous - naive and trusting; young; unsophisticated; candid
::: infirmity - weakness
::: mandate - order; charge; authoritative command; power to govern another country; power to given to a government; region under administration; V: give a mandate to; place under a mandate; Ex. mandated territory
::: flourish - grow well; prosper; make sweeping gestures; wave; brandish; Ex. The trees flourished in the sun. N: showy movement or gesture; embellishment or ornamentation (esp. in handwriting)
::: recant - disclaim or disavow; retract a previous statement; openly confess error; Ex. recant one's faith/a statement
::: protuberance - protrusion; swelling; bulge
::: fallible - liable to err