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Vocabulary Word

Word: qualified

Definition: limited; restricted; V. qualify: limit the meaning of; modify


Sentences Containing 'qualified'

Nay, were your friend Lady Catherine to know me, I am persuaded she would find me in every respect ill qualified for the situation.''
``Perhaps,''said Darcy,``I should have judged better, had I sought an introduction; but I am ill qualified to recommend myself to strangers.''
``Shall we ask him why a man of sense and education, and who has lived in the world, is ill qualified to recommend himself to strangers?''
Age is no better, hardly so well, qualified for an instructor as youth, for it has not profited so much as it has lost.
To have served an apprenticeship in the town, under a master properly qualified, is commonly the necessary requisite for obtaining this freedom.
As to have wrought seven years under a master properly qualified, was necessary, in order to entitle my person to become a master, and to have himself apprentices in a common trade; so to have studied seven years under a master properly qualified, was necessary to entitle him to become a master, teacher, or doctor (words anciently synonymous), in the liberal arts, and to have scholars or apprentices (words likewise originally synonymous) to study under him.
In Paris, five years is the term required in a great number; but, before any person can be qualified to exercise the trade as a master, he must, in many of them, serve five years more as a journeyman.
The linen manufacture, indeed, is in England, by a particular statute, open to every body; but as it is not much cultivated through the greater part of the country, it can afford no general resource to the work men of other decaying manufactures, who, wherever the statute of apprenticeship takes place, have no other choice, but dither to come upon the parish, or to work as common labourers; for which, by their habits, they are much worse qualified than for any sort of manufacture that bears any resemblance to their own.
Those things which the common sort of people do admire, are most of them such things as are very general, and may be comprehended under things merely natural, or naturally affected and qualified: as stones, wood, figs, vines, olives.
Then consider the utmost bounds of time that that cause, thus and thus qualified, can subsist and abide.
However, recalling the advice of his host as to the requisites he ought to carry with him, especially that referring to money and shirts, he determined to go home and provide himself with all, and also with a squire, for he reckoned upon securing a farm-labourer, a neighbour of his, a poor man with a family, but very well qualified for the office of squire to a knight.
It happened that the person who had him in charge was a majordomo of the duke's, a man of great discretion and humour--and there can be no humour without discretion--and the same who played the part of the Countess Trifaldi in the comical way that has been already described; and thus qualified, and instructed by his master and mistress as to how to deal with Sancho, he carried out their scheme admirably.
An artist must be better qualified to succeed in this undertaking, who, besides a delicate taste and a quick apprehension, possesses an accurate knowledge of the internal fabric, the operations of the understanding, the workings of the passions, and the various species of sentiment which discriminate vice and virtue.
'It ain't bad,' said Mr. Barkis, who generally qualified his speech, and rarely committed himself.
I was so young and childish, and so little qualified--how could I be otherwise?--to undertake the whole charge of my own existence, that often, in going to Murdstone and Grinby's, of a morning, I could not resist the stale pastry put out for sale at half-price at the pastrycooks' doors, and spent in that the money I should have kept for my dinner.
'I am poorly qualified to judge of such matters,' replied Agnes, with a modest hesitation, 'but I certainly feel--in short, I feel that your being secret and clandestine, is not being like yourself.'
When my evenings were unoccupied by the pursuit for which I had qualified myself with so much pains, and I was engaged in writing at home, she would sit quietly near me, however late the hour, and be so mute, that I would often think she had dropped asleep.
I would have qualified that conclusion, but he stopped me.
'Sir,' he rejoined, with an occasional separation and reunion of those delicate tips, 'my answer must be qualified; because, to betray Mr. james's confidence to his mother, and to betray it to you, are two different actions.
But they thought the want of moral virtues was so far from being supplied by superior endowments of the mind, that employments could never be put into such dangerous hands as those of persons so qualified; and, at least, that the mistakes committed by ignorance, in a virtuous disposition, would never be of such fatal consequence to the public weal, as the practices of a man, whose inclinations led him to be corrupt, and who had great abilities to manage, to multiply, and defend his corruptions.
And thus ambassadors would be qualified to treat with foreign princes, or ministers of state, to whose tongues they were utter strangers.
These unhappy people were proposing schemes for persuading monarchs to choose favourites upon the score of their wisdom, capacity, and virtue; of teaching ministers to consult the public good; of rewarding merit, great abilities, eminent services; of instructing princes to know their true interest, by placing it on the same foundation with that of their people; of choosing for employments persons qualified to exercise them, with many other wild, impossible chimeras, that never entered before into the heart of man to conceive; and confirmed in me the old observation, “that there is nothing so extravagant and irrational, which some philosophers have not maintained for truth.” But, however, I shall so far do justice to this part of the Academy, as to acknowledge that all of them were not so visionary.
There is indeed a perpetual commerce between this kingdom and the great empire of Japan; and it is very probable, that the Japanese authors may have given some account of the _struldbrugs_; but my stay in Japan was so short, and I was so entirely a stranger to the language, that I was not qualified to make any inquiries.
When I thought of my family, my friends, my countrymen, or the human race in general, I considered them, as they really were, _Yahoos_ in shape and disposition, perhaps a little more civilized, and qualified with the gift of speech; but making no other use of reason, than to improve and multiply those vices whereof their brethren in this country had only the share that nature allotted them.
Nor is it so very unlikely, that far from distrusting his fitness for another whaling voyage, on account of such dark symptoms, the calculating people of that prudent isle were inclined to harbor the conceit, that for those very reasons he was all the better qualified and set on edge, for a pursuit so full of rage and wildness as the bloody hunt of whales.
Therefore, though I am but ill qualified for a pioneer, in the application of these two semi-sciences to the whale, I will do my endeavor.
Look now at Stubb; a man who from his humorous, deliberate coolness and equanimity in the direst emergencies, was specially qualified to excel in pitchpoling.

More Vocab Words

::: imperturbable - unshakably calm; placid
::: warranted - justified; authorized
::: accessible - easy to approach; obtainable
::: sovereignty - complete independence and self-government (of a country); supremacy of authority; power to govern
::: schematic - of a schema or scheme; relating to an outline or diagram; using a system of symbols; N. schema: diagrammatic representation; outline
::: malevolent - wishing evil; exhibiting ill will; N. malevolence
::: tumult - commotion of a great crowd; riot; noise; uproar; ADJ. tumultuous: noisy and disorderly
::: tangible - able to be touched; real; concrete; palpable; possible to realize or understand; Ex. tangible proof
::: allegory - story, play, or picture in which characters are used as symbols; fable
::: incognito - with identity concealed; using an assumed name; ADJ.