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Vocabulary Word

Word: prudent

Definition: cautious; careful; prudential


Sentences Containing 'prudent'

Consider Mr. Collins's respectability, and Charlotte's steady, prudent character.
``Pray, my dear aunt, what is the difference in matrimonial affairs, between the mercenary and the prudent motive?
He promises fairly; and I hope among different people, where they may each have a character to preserve, they will both be more prudent.
Her prudent mother, occupied by the same ideas, forbore to invite him to sit by herself.
and they thought that a prudent man would carefully select the safest position, where Dr. B. might be on hand at a moment's warning.
At dark, as it was not prudent to run, a place alongside the woods was hunted and to a tall gum tree the boat was made fast for the night.
replied Danglars;``gone, as every prudent man ought to be, to look after his own affairs, most likely.
Spada, a prudent man, and greatly attached to his only nephew, a young captain of the highest promise, took paper and pen, and made his will.
Prison had made Edmond prudent, and he was desirous of running no risk whatever.
``By all means, be as wise as Nestor and as prudent as Ulysses; I do more than permit, I exhort you.''
Franz was prudent, and wished to learn all he possibly could concerning his host.
``On my word,''said Franz,``you are wise as Nestor and prudent as Ulysses, and your fair Circe must be very skilful or very powerful if she succeed in changing you into a beast of any kind.''
``Be prudent, in any event,''said the countess.
Now you are a man, and are able to give me advice; yet I repeat to you, Albert, be prudent.''
He contemplated with unspeakable delight the large diamond which shone on the major's little finger; for the major, like a prudent man, in case of any accident happening to his bank notes, had immediately converted them into an available asset.
``So you recommend''``I recommend you to be prudent.''
But the glass cutter was a prudent man who had provided for all emergencies.
Mercedes saw it and with the double instinct of woman and mother guessed all; but as she was prudent and strong minded she concealed both her sorrows and her fears.
With this consoling idea, I leave you, madame, and most prudent wife, without any conscientious reproach for abandoning you; you have friends left, and the ashes I have already mentioned, and above all the liberty I hasten to restore to you.
The last alternative seemed the most prudent, so he waited until twelveo'clock.
In order to avoid the inconveniency of such situations, every prudent man in every period of society, after the first establishment of the division of labour, must naturally have endeavoured to manage his affairs in such a manner, as to have at all times by him, besides the peculiar produce of his own industry, a certain quantity of some one commodity or other, such as he imagined few people would be likely to refuse in exchange for the produce of their industry.
The difficulties, accordingly, which the Bank of England, which the principal bankers in London, and which even the more prudent Scotch banks began, after a certain time, and when all of them had already gone too far, to make about discounting, not only alarmed, but enraged, in the highest degree, those projectors.
Their own distress, of which this prudent and necessary reserve of the banks was, no doubt, the immediate occasion, they called the distress of the country; and this distress of the country, they said, was altogether owing to the ignorance, pusillanimity, and bad conduct of the banks, which did not give a sufficiently liberal aid to the spirited undertakings of those who exerted themselves in order to beautify, improve, and enrich the country.
The success of this operation, therefore, without increasing in the smallest degree the capital of the country, would only have transferred a great part of it from prudent and profitable to imprudent and unprofitable undertakings.
But we shall find this to have been the case of almost all nations, in all tolerably quiet and peaceable times, even of those who have not enjoyed the most prudent and parsimonious governments.
It is the maxim of every prudent master of a family, never to attempt to make at home what it will cost him more to make than to buy.
Without intending the interest of the people, he is necessarily led, by a regard to his own interest, to treat them, even in years of scarcity, pretty much in the same manner as the prudent master of a vessel is sometimes obliged to treat his crew.
They are the projects, therefore, to which, of all others, a prudent lawgiver, who desired to increase the capital of his nation, would least choose to give any extraordinary encouragement, or to turn towards them a greater share of that capital than what would go to them of its own accord.
During a peace of about seven years continuance, the prudent and truly patriotic administration of Mr. Pelham was not able to pay off an old debt of six millions.
Why should imprudent unlearned souls trouble that which is both learned, and prudent?
May not thy mind for all this continue pure, prudent, temperate, just?
And that thou mayest clearly see this, say, Anselmo, hast thou not told me that I must force my suit upon a modest woman, decoy one that is virtuous, make overtures to one that is pure-minded, pay court to one that is prudent?
Then, if thou knowest that thou hast a wife, modest, virtuous, pure-minded and prudent, what is it that thou seekest?
A prudent old man was giving advice to another, the father of a young girl, to lock her up, watch over her and keep her in seclusion, and among other arguments he used these: Woman is a thing of glass; But her brittleness 'tis best Not too curiously to test: Who knows what may come to pass?
And, perhaps, our progress in natural philosophy is chiefly retarded by the want of proper experiments and phaenomena, which are often discovered by chance, and cannot always be found, when requisite, even by the most diligent and prudent enquiry.
Nor could I help thinking this a prudent course, since she looked at me out of the pickle-jar, with as great an access of sourness as if her black eyes had absorbed its contents.
'I am bound to state to you,' he said, with an official air, 'that the business habits, and the prudent suggestions, of Mrs. Micawber, have in a great measure conduced to this result.
'It seems to us,' said she, 'prudent, Mr. Traddles, to bring these feelings to the test of our own observation.
I was heartily tired of being sagacious and prudent by myself, and of seeing my darling under restraint; so I bought a pretty pair of ear-rings for her, and a collar for Jip, and went home one day to make myself agreeable.
I thought it the most prudent method to lie still, and my design was to continue so till night, when, my left hand being already loose, I could easily free myself: and as for the inhabitants, I had reason to believe I might be a match for the greatest army they could bring against me, if they were all of the same size with him that I saw.
I drew it out, and at his desire, as well as I could, expressed to him the use of it; and charging it only with powder, which, by the closeness of my pouch, happened to escape wetting in the sea (an inconvenience against which all prudent mariners take special care to provide,) I first cautioned the emperor not to be afraid, and then I let it off in the air.
By which the reader may conceive an idea of the ingenuity of that people, as well as the prudent and exact economy of so great a prince.
He took me up in his right fore-foot and held me as a nurse does a child she is going to suckle, just as I have seen the same sort of creature do with a kitten in Europe; and when I offered to struggle he squeezed me so hard, that I thought it more prudent to submit.
I mentioned the prudent management of our treasury; the valour and achievements of our forces, by sea and land.
There was a most ingenious architect, who had contrived a new method for building houses, by beginning at the roof, and working downward to the foundation; which he justified to me, by the like practice of those two prudent insects, the bee and the spider.
After some further discourse, which I then conjectured might relate to me, the two friends took their leaves, with the same compliment of striking each other’s hoof; and the gray made me signs that I should walk before him; wherein I thought it prudent to comply, till I could find a better director.
The _Lilliputians_, I think, are hardly worth the charge of a fleet and army to reduce them; and I question whether it might be prudent or safe to attempt the _Brobdingnagians_; or whether an English army would be much at their ease with the Flying Island over their heads.
Yet when Jonah fairly takes out his purse, prudent suspicions still molest the Captain.
Nor is it at all prudent for the hunter to be over curious touching the precise nature of the whale spout.
Like a mob of young collegians, they are full of fight, fun, and wickedness, tumbling round the world at such a reckless, rollicking rate, that no prudent underwriter would insure them any more than he would a riotous lad at Yale or Harvard.

More Vocab Words

::: genesis - beginning; origin
::: reparable - capable of being repaired
::: militia - army composed of ordinary citizens rather than professional soldiers
::: fatuous - smugly and unconsciously foolish; inane; silly; N. fatuity, fatuousness
::: scuttle - sink (a ship) by cutting holes in the hull; scrap; discard; N: small hatch in a ship's deck or hull
::: blighted - suffering from a disease; destroyed
::: sedentary - requiring sitting; done while sitting; not moving from one place to another; settled; Ex. sedentary job/population
::: malefactor - evildoer; criminal
::: annuity - yearly allowance
::: sleazy - shabby and dirty; flimsy; insubstantial; Ex. sleazy back-street hotel/fabric