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Vocabulary Word

Word: profusion

Definition: great amount; plenty; overabundance; excess; lavish expenditure; Ex. profusion of choices; ADJ. profuse: plentiful; copious; giving or given abundantly; extravagant


Sentences Containing 'profusion'

A Shakespeare garden usually includes several dozen species, either in herbaceous profusion or in a geometric layout with boxwood dividers.
asked Eugenie;``almost opposite to us, with that profusion of beautiful light hair?''
But the loss occasioned by the negligence, profusion, and malversation of the servants of the company, had probably been a tax much heavier than all those duties.
But there must surely be something more than ordinary absurdity in continuing such profusion in times of general difficulty and distress.
But whether such a government us that of England, which, whatever may be its virtues, has never been famous for good economy; which, in time of peace, has generally conducted itself with the slothful and negligent profusion that is, perhaps, natural to monarchies; and, in time of war, has constantly acted with all the thoughtless extravagance that democracies are apt to fall into, could be safely trusted with the management of such a project, must at least be a good deal more doubtful.
Elsewhere" employed a large ensemble cast; a gritty, "realistic" visual style; and a profusion of interlocking serialized stories, many of which continued over the course of several episodes, if not multiple seasons.
Having found a female tree exactly sixty yards from a male tree, I put the stigmas of twenty flowers, taken from different branches, under the microscope, and on all, without exception, there were a few pollen-grains, and on some a profusion.
Here palms, alpacas, and volcanoes; sun's disks and stars; ecliptics, horns-of-plenty, and rich banners waving, are in luxuriant profusion stamped; so that the precious gold seems almost to derive an added preciousness and enhancing glories, by passing through those fancy mints, so Spanishly poetic.
In addition, the profusion of Singlish features, especially loanwords from Asian languages, mood particles, and topic-prominent structure, can easily make Singlish incomprehensible to a speaker of Standard English.
In the 1800s, the creek powered a profusion of hat factories (including the Tioronda Hat Works, located in the brick building adjacent to the park), which earned Beacon the nickname "New York's Hat-Making Capital." Fishkill Marsh supports a variety of wildlife.
In this book, the images are accompanied by short stories and provocative and challenging beauty is adorned with a profusion of tattoos and piercing.
It is merely to enable the company to support the negligence, profusion, and malversation of their own servants, whose disorderly conduct seldom allows the dividend of the company to exceed the ordinary rate of profit in trades which are altogether free, and very frequently makes a fall even a good deal short of that rate.
It is said, accordingly, to be very considerable, and that you frequently find there a profusion of plate in houses, where there is nothing else which would in other countries be thought suitable or correspondent to this sort of magnificence.
It was naturally to be expected, therefore, that folly, negligence, and profusion, should prevail in the whole management of their affairs.
Negligence and profusion, therefore, must always prevail, more or less, in the management of the affairs of such a company.
No accumulation could have supported so great an annual profusion.
No trace or vestige of the expense of the latter would remain, and the effects of ten or twenty years' profusion would be as completely annihilated as if they had never existed.
She put her arms round my neck, and laughed, and called herself by her favourite name of a goose, and hid her face on my shoulder in such a profusion of curls that it was quite a task to clear them away and see it.
She realized in some measure the extravagant hopes of her votaries; and in the discovery and conquest of Mexico and Peru (of which the one happened about thirty, and the other about forty, years after the first expedition of Columbus), she presented them with something not very unlike that profusion of the precious metals which they sought for.
Slant Magazine's Jesse Cataldo felt that "The profusion of guests and mania for exhibiting street hardness sometimes makes "The R.E.D. Album" feel unfocused and exhausting."
Such nations are always strangers to every sort of luxury, and great wealth can scarce ever be dissipated among them by improvident profusion.
The dorsal coloration consists of a light to dark brown background with a series of 8–10 striking yellowish to reddish brown "saddles" with darker margins, all covered by a profusion of small white spots.
The great increase of their fortune had, it seems, only served to furnish their servants with a pretext for greater profusion, and a cover for greater malversation, than in proportion even to that increase of fortune.
The Old Town district has a profusion of bronze statues and marble monuments.
The pearls were in profusion and very fine, for the highest display and adornment of the Moorish women is decking themselves with rich pearls and seed-pearls; and of these there are therefore more among the Moors than among any other people.
The profits of it only are spent in Spain and Portugal, where they help to support the sumptuous profusion of the merchants of Cadiz and Lisbon.
The profusion of human sewage in the Bollin was still around in 1850.
The profusion with which the affairs of princes are always managed, renders it almost impossible that they should.
Their ill success was imputed, by their factors and agents, to the extortion and oppression of the Spanish government; but was, perhaps, principally owing to the profusion and depredations of those very factors and agents; some of whom are said to have acquired great fortunes, even in one year.
Therefore since money alone was able to perform all these feats, our _Yahoos_ thought they could never have enough of it to spend, or to save, as they found themselves inclined, from their natural bent either to profusion or avarice; that the rich man enjoyed the fruit of the poor man’s labour, and the latter were a thousand to one in proportion to the former; that the bulk of our people were forced to live miserably, by labouring every day for small wages, to make a few live plentifully.” I enlarged myself much on these, and many other particulars to the same purpose; but his honour was still to seek; for he went upon a supposition, that all animals had a title to their share in the productions of the earth, and especially those who presided over the rest.
Those agents frequently live with the profusion of princes; and sometimes, too, in spite of that profusion, and by a proper method of making up their accounts, acquire the fortunes of princes.
through this composition Strauss has lately demonstrated that he still has at his disposal a profusion of piquant and original melodies."
To reduce very much the number of his servants, to reform his table from great profusion to great frugality, to lay down his equipage after he has once set it up, are changes which cannot escape the observation of his neighbours, and which are supposed to imply some acknowledgment of preceding bad conduct.
To see Miss Mowcher standing over him, looking at his rich profusion of brown hair through a large round magnifying glass, which she took out of her pocket, was a most amazing spectacle.
Your profusion makes me saving; and if you lament over him much longer, my heart will be as light as a feather.''

More Vocab Words

::: aureole - sun's corona; halo; bright circle of light
::: lament - grieve; express sorrow; N. lamentation
::: barrage - barrier laid down by artillery fire; overwhelming profusion; large number of questions or statements; Ex. a barrage of criticism
::: boorish - rude; insensitive
::: fathom - comprehend; investigate; determine the depth of; N. unit of measurement for the depth of water
::: modicum - limited quantity; small amount; Ex. He does not have a modicum of sense; CF. moderate
::: hindsight - understanding the nature of an event after it has actually happened
::: sententious - pithy; terse; concise; aphoristic
::: ruffian - violent scoundrel; bully
::: procurement - obtaining; V. procure: obtain by effort; obtain (a prostitute) for another