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Vocabulary Word

Word: pretext

Definition: excuse


Sentences Containing 'pretext'

The moment I was in the presence, even in the darkest night, I could feel those yellow eyes upon me, and knew their owner was watching for a pretext to spit out some venom on me.
Brown was ALWAYS watching for a pretext to find fault; and if he could find no plausible pretext, he would invent one.
Sometimes, after palming off a particularly fantastic and outrageous lie upon me, he was so`full of laugh'that he had to step aside for a minute, upon one pretext or another, to keep me from suspecting.
Marseilles is filled with half pay officers, who are daily, under one frivolous pretext or other, getting up quarrels with the royalists; from hence arise continual and fatal duels among the higher classes of persons, and assassinations in the lower.''
under pretext of trading along the coast, these men, who are in reality smugglers, will prefer selling me to doing a good action.
As soon as his engagement with the patron of The Young Amelia ended, he would hire a small vessel on his own account for in his several voyages he had amassed a hundred piastres and under some pretext land at the Island of Monte Cristo.
Maximilian leaped at one bound into his crop of lucerne, which he began to pull up in the most ruthless way, under the pretext of being occupied in weeding it.
The pretext of an opera engagement was so much the more feasible, as there chanced to be on that very night a more than ordinary attraction at the Academie Royale.
Both the count and Baptistin had told the truth when they announced to Morcerf the proposed visit of the major, which had served Monte Cristo as a pretext for declining Albert's invitation.
Nothing more is wanting than to arrest the count as a vagabond, on the pretext of his being too rich.''
In 1730, their affairs were in so great disorder, that they were altogether incapable of maintaining their forts and garrisons, the sole purpose and pretext of their institution.
The great increase of their fortune had, it seems, only served to furnish their servants with a pretext for greater profusion, and a cover for greater malversation, than in proportion even to that increase of fortune.
The English copper company of London, the lead-smelting company, the glass-grinding company, have not even the pretext of any great or singular utility in the object which they pursue; nor does the pursuit of that object seem to require any expense unsuitable to the fortunes of many private men.
For goodness' sake don't you ever on any pretext set your foot over the threshold at night, for it's as much as your life is worth.'
Indeed, I have reason to suspect myself on this head; and each year, as the tax-gatherer comes round, I find myself disposed to review the acts and position of the general and State governments, and the spirit of the people to discover a pretext for conformity.

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::: inexorable - relentless; unyielding; implacable; not capable of being changed by entreaty or efforts; Ex. inexorable price rises
::: embark - commence; go on board a boat; begin a journey
::: concession - an act of yielding; conceding; something conceded; point, right, etc. given unwillingly; privilege of maintaining a business in a certain place; Ex. oil concessions in the North sea; CF. concessionaire
::: occult - mysterious; secret; supernatural; beyond human comprehension; CF. mysterious to human ?; OP. bare
::: rife - (of something bad) widespread; abundant; current
::: credulity - belief on slight evidence; gullibility; naivet\'e; ADJ. credulous