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Vocabulary Word

Word: postmortem

Definition: autopsy; ADJ: occurring after death; of a postmortem


Sentences Containing 'postmortem'

"Chrysomya’s" primary importance to the field of medico-criminal forensic entomology is due to the genus’ reliable life cycle, allowing investigators to accurately develop a postmortem interval. "Chrysomya" adults are typically metallic colored with thick setae on the meron and plumose arista.
A post-mortem was carried out and no sign of semen was found.
Breaches of the Human Tissue Act. In August 2009 postmortem examinations had to be stopped at the hospital following an inspection which revealed serious breaches of the Human Tissue Act 2004, including the unauthorised storage of human brains.
Forensic entomologists use a variety of tools to determine post-mortem interval: Insect Collection.
Hall was heavily interrogated as to his method for figuring the post-mortem interval and important weather factors.
His death was treated as suspicious, as a post-mortem examination found him to have four broken ribs that led to his death.
Mir-34a is found overexpressed in the CSF and brain extracellular fluid in postmortem studies comparing patients with AD and controls
Occasionally suicides and assassins were buried upside down, as a post-mortem punishment and (as with burial at cross-roads) to inhibit the activities of the resulting undead.
On November 7, 2012, following the presidential election, Rubin published a 'post-mortem' column criticizing the unsuccessful Mitt Romney campaign as ineffectual. In response, others criticized Rubin as having been disingenuous or misleading during her pre-election coverage of the 2012 campaign.
Post-mortem examinations indicated some of the victims were beaten and then executed.
Taken together, the injuries appear to be a combination of battle wounds, which were the cause of death, followed by "post-mortem" "humiliation wounds" inflicted on the corpse.
The dopamine hypothesis is now thought to be simplistic, partly because newer antipsychotic medication (atypical antipsychotic medication) can be just as effective as older medication (typical antipsychotic medication), but also affects serotonin function and may have slightly less of a dopamine blocking effect. Interest has also focused on the neurotransmitter glutamate and the reduced function of the NMDA glutamate receptor in schizophrenia, largely because of the abnormally low levels of glutamate receptors found in the postmortem brains of those diagnosed with schizophrenia, and the discovery that glutamate-blocking drugs such as phencyclidine and ketamine can mimic the symptoms and cognitive problems associated with the condition.
There was no evidence of foul play, and although suicide was suspected by some, there was no hard evidence for this and a post-mortem failed to determine the cause of death.
This chief importance is "Chrysomya’s" use as a means of developing an accurate postmortem interval in criminal investigations.
Two notable examples are "The Book Thief" by Markus Zusak, where the narrator is Death, and "The Lovely Bones" by Alice Sebold, where a young girl, having been killed, observes, from some post-mortem, extracorporeal viewpoint, her family struggling to cope with her disappearance.

More Vocab Words

::: subsistence - existence; means of subsisting; means of support; livelihood; V. subsist: exist; maintain life (at a meager level)
::: whittle - pare; cut away thin bits (from wood); fashion in this way; reduce gradually; trim
::: inured - accustomed; hardened; Ex. inured to the Alaskan cold; V. inure: make used to something undesirable; harden; CF. unfeeling
::: aristocracy - hereditary nobility; privileged class; government by nobility; N. aristocrat
::: labyrinth - maze
::: interrogate - question closely; cross-examine; cross-question
::: rustle - make slight sounds like silk moving or being rubbed together
::: stifle - suppress; extinguish; inhibit; smother or suffocate
::: blithe - (blithesome) gay; joyous
::: efface - rub out; remove the surface of