Vocabulary Builder

Vocabulary Builder

    Improve Your Writing

  • Boost your vocabulary
  • See words in the context of real sentences
  • Learn by association and by definition
  • Master a new lexicon!

Get Started Below

Vocabulary Word

Word: piety

Definition: devoutness; reverence for God; ADJ. pious


Sentences Containing 'piety'

The words which express our faith and piety are not definite; yet they are significant and fragrant like frankincense to superior natures.
His singleness of purpose and resolution, and his elevated piety, endowed him, without his knowledge, with perennial youth.
Morrel could not resist this; he was not exemplary for piety, he was not easily impressed, but Valentine suffering, weeping, wringing her hands before him, was more than he could bear in silence.
``Well,''replied Mercedes, sighing,``go, Albert; I will not make you a slave to your filial piety.''
``I once possessed piety, innocence, and love, the three ingredients of the happiness of angels, and now what am I?''
In the great landed estates, which the mistaken piety both of princes and private persons had bestowed upon the church, jurisdictions were established, of the same kind with those of the great barons, and for the same reason.
Now for the better remembrance of those names that we have spoken of, thou shalt find it a very good help, to remember the Gods as often as may be: and that, the thing which they require at our hands of as many of us, as are by nature reasonable creation is not that with fair words, and outward show of piety and devotion we should flatter them, but that we should become like unto them: and that as all other natural creatures, the fig tree for example; the dog the bee: both do, all of them, and apply themselves unto that which by their natural constitution, is proper unto them; so man likewise should do that, which by his nature, as he is a man, belongs unto him.
He can set forth the craftiness of Ulysses, the piety of AEneas, the valour of Achilles, the misfortunes of Hector, the treachery of Sinon, the friendship of Euryalus, the generosity of Alexander, the boldness of Caesar, the clemency and truth of Trajan, the fidelity of Zopyrus, the wisdom of Cato, and in short all the faculties that serve to make an illustrious man perfect, now uniting them in one individual, again distributing them among many; and if this be done with charm of style and ingenious invention, aiming at the truth as much as possible, he will assuredly weave a web of bright and varied threads that, when finished, will display such perfection and beauty that it will attain the worthiest object any writing can seek, which, as I said before, is to give instruction and pleasure combined; for the unrestricted range of these books enables the author to show his powers, epic, lyric, tragic, or comic, and all the moods the sweet and winning arts of poesy and oratory are capable of; for the epic may be written in prose just as well as in verse."
It was written with a plain, unaffected, homely piety that I knew to be genuine, and ended with 'my duty to my ever darling'--meaning myself.
But I confess, that, after I had been a little too copious in talking of my own beloved country, of our trade and wars by sea and land, of our schisms in religion, and parties in the state; the prejudices of his education prevailed so far, that he could not forbear taking me up in his right hand, and stroking me gently with the other, after a hearty fit of laughing, asked me, “whether I was a whig or tory?” Then turning to his first minister, who waited behind him with a white staff, near as tall as the mainmast of the Royal Sovereign, he observed “how contemptible a thing was human grandeur, which could be mimicked by such diminutive insects as I: and yet,” says he, “I dare engage these creatures have their titles and distinctions of honour; they contrive little nests and burrows, that they call houses and cities; they make a figure in dress and equipage; they love, they fight, they dispute, they cheat, they betray!” And thus he continued on, while my colour came and went several times, with indignation, to hear our noble country, the mistress of arts and arms, the scourge of France, the arbitress of Europe, the seat of virtue, piety, honour, and truth, the pride and envy of the world, so contemptuously treated.
It does not appear, from all you have said, how any one perfection is required toward the procurement of any one station among you; much less, that men are ennobled on account of their virtue; that priests are advanced for their piety or learning; soldiers, for their conduct or valour; judges, for their integrity; senators, for the love of their country; or counsellors for their wisdom.
For having strictly examined all the persons of greatest name in the courts of princes, for a hundred years past, I found how the world had been misled by prostitute writers, to ascribe the greatest exploits in war, to cowards; the wisest counsel, to fools; sincerity, to flatterers; Roman virtue, to betrayers of their country; piety, to atheists; chastity, to sodomites; truth, to informers: how many innocent and excellent persons had been condemned to death or banishment by the practising of great ministers upon the corruption of judges, and the malice of factions: how many villains had been exalted to the highest places of trust, power, dignity, and profit: how great a share in the motions and events of courts, councils, and senates might be challenged by bawds, whores, pimps, parasites, and buffoons.
He looked at me with a sort of condescending concern and compassion, as though he thought it a great pity that such a sensible young man should be so hopelessly lost to evangelical pagan piety.
Nor can piety itself, at such a shameful sight, completely stifle her upbraidings against the permitting stars.

More Vocab Words

::: dour - sullen; gloomy; stubborn
::: traverse - go through or across
::: defray - provide for the payment of; undertake the payment of; pay
::: stickler - perfectionist; person who insists things be exactly right
::: abysmal - bottomless
::: sartorial - pertaining to tailors or tailoring; Ex. a man of great sartorial elegance; CF. sartor: tailor
::: petrify - turn to stone; cause to become stonelike; stun or paralyze
::: retroactive - taking effect before its enactment (as a law) or imposition (as a tax); (of a law) having effect on the past as well as the future
::: ejaculation - exclamation; abrupt ejection (to discharge sperm); V. ejaculate
::: carousal - drunken revel; V. carouse