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Vocabulary Word

Word: parallelism

Definition: state of being parallel; similarity; analogy


Sentences Containing 'parallelism'

This parallelism can only be used successfully with the simplest lines, such as a straight line or a simple curve; it is never advisable except in decorative patterns to be used with complicated shapes.
Blake is very fond of the sustained effect parallelism gives, and uses the repetition of curved and straight lines very often in his compositions.
Note in Plate I of the Job series, page 146 -LRB- Transcribers Note: Plate XXXI -RRB-, the use made of this sustaining quality in the parallelism of the sheep's backs in the background and the parallel upward flow of the lines of the figures.
The emphasis that parallelism gives to the music of particular lines is well illustrated in all Blake's work.
Compare A with Plate XXXI, C; note how the emotional quality is dependent in both cases on the parallelism of the upward flow of the lines.
I am fully persuaded that this double parallelism is by no means an accident or an illusion.
This view is strongly supported by a parallelism of another kind: namely, that, firstly, slight changes in the conditions of life add to the vigour and fertility of all organic beings; and secondly, that the crossing of forms, which have been exposed to slightly different conditions of life, or which have varied, favours the size, vigour and fertility of their offspring.
In the several successive palaeozoic formations of Russia, Western Europe and North America, a similar parallelism in the forms of life has been observed by several authors; so it is, according to Lyell, with the European and North American tertiary deposits.
Even if the few fossil species which are common to the Old and New Worlds were kept wholly out of view, the general parallelism in the successive forms of life, in the palaeozoic and tertiary stages, would still be manifest, and the several formations could be easily correlated.
After referring to the parallelism of the palaeozoic forms of life in various parts of Europe, they add, "If struck by this strange sequence, we turn our attention to North America, and there discover a series of analogous phenomena, it will appear certain that all these modifications of species, their extinction, and the introduction of new ones, cannot be owing to mere changes in marine currents or other causes more or less local and temporary, but depend on general laws which govern the whole animal kingdom."
We might therefore expect to find, as we do find, a less strict degree of parallelism in the succession of the productions of the land than with those of the sea.
Mr. Prestwich, in his admirable Memoirs on the eocene deposits of England and France, is able to draw a close general parallelism between the successive stages in the two countries; but when he compares certain stages in England with those in France, although he finds in both a curious accordance in the numbers of the species belonging to the same genera, yet the species themselves differ in a manner very difficult to account for considering the proximity of the two areas, unless, indeed, it be assumed that an isthmus separated two seas inhabited by distinct, but contemporaneous faunas.
Barrande, also, shows that there is a striking general parallelism in the successive Silurian deposits of Bohemia and Scandinavia; nevertheless he finds a surprising amount of difference in the species.
Notwithstanding this general parallelism in the conditions of Old and New Worlds, how widely different are their living productions!
A naturalist, struck with a parallelism of this nature, by arbitrarily raising or sinking the value of the groups in several classes (and all our experience shows that their valuation is as yet arbitrary), could easily extend the parallelism over a wide range; and thus the septenary, quinary, quaternary and ternary classifications have probably arisen.
We can see why there should be so striking a parallelism in the distribution of organic beings throughout space, and in their geological succession throughout time; for in both cases the beings have been connected by the bond of ordinary generation, and the means of modification have been the same.

More Vocab Words

::: imperceptible - unnoticeable; impossible to perceive; undetectable
::: homily - sermon; tedious moralizing lecture; serious warning; ADJ. homiletic
::: exceptionable - objectionable; likely to cause dislike; offensive; CF. unexceptionable: entirely acceptable
::: corroborate - confirm; support; strengthen
::: serenity - calmness; placidity; ADJ. serene
::: scintilla - trace; minute amount; shred; least bit; Ex. There is not a scintilla of truth; CF. spark
::: dorsal - relating to the back of an animal; Ex. dorsal fin
::: parity - equality; close resemblance; CF. disparate
::: crotchety - (of someone old) eccentric; odd; whimsical; bad-tempered; N. crotchet: odd or whimsical notion
::: colloquial - pertaining to conversational or common speech; informal; N. colloquialism: colloquial expression