Vocabulary Builder

Vocabulary Builder

    Improve Your Writing

  • Boost your vocabulary
  • See words in the context of real sentences
  • Learn by association and by definition
  • Master a new lexicon!

Get Started Below

Vocabulary Word

Word: melancholy

Definition: gloomy; morose; blue; N. ADJ. melancholic; CF. melancholia


Sentences Containing 'melancholy'

"Bring it up; there's nothing else for it," said Starbuck, after a melancholy pause.
'Quite as comfortable as we can expect a young mother to be, under these melancholy domestic circumstances.
A melancholy picture, and a continuous one; hundreds of miles of it.
A shade of melancholy gravity overspread his countenance, which was not natural to him.
All night he was lulled by the melancholy noise of the surf.
All this will make me continue my journey, not with the satisfaction in which I began it, but in the deepest melancholy and sadness.
asked the traveller, to whose orders the yacht was for the time submitted, in a melancholy voice.
Backus's melancholy vanished instantly, and with it the memory of his late mistake.
Bradshaw lived in poverty and debt, and under the additional burden of a melancholy temperament.
But Monte Cristo looked at him with so melancholy and sweet a smile, that Maximilian felt the tears filling his eyes.
Dantes listened to these melancholy tidings with outward calmness; but, leaping lightly ashore, he signified his desire to be quite alone.
Every one had arrived almost before the usual hour, and was conversing on the melancholy event which was to attract the attention of the public towards one of their most illustrious colleagues.
He could not do this, he whose past life was so short, whose present so melancholy, and his future so doubtful.
He is also intrigued by children's literature with a sinister or melancholy streak.
He seated himself on the edge of that terrible bed, and fell into melancholy and gloomy revery.
However, this melancholy event did not delay Colville in his departure.
I never was romantic, and am no melancholy hero.
I was very much shocked to hear of this melancholy accident, and said I thought I had better have some water.
I watched there six days and nights, and a very melancholy experience it was.
In his closet at Christ Church, Oxford, Robert Burton wrote "The Anatomie of Melancholy" (1621).
In this song, Farmer "acts as an observer of her own life", and "claims her love for melancholy, sadness and loneliness".
Leaving them together, I went home to Peggotty's; more melancholy myself, if possible, than I had been yet.
Listen to the voice of your heart, Morrel, and ask it whether you ought to preserve this melancholy exterior towards me.''
Longing and melancholy, "Since I Lost My Baby" tells a story about the pain of losing a lover.
Lydia's going to Brighton was all that consoled her for her melancholy conviction of her husband's never intending to go there himself.
Melancholy hates haste and floats in silence.
Melancholy in a capitalist, like the appearance of a comet, presages some misfortune to the world.''
Mrs. Chillip's opinion is, that her spirit has been entirely broken since her marriage, and that she is all but melancholy mad.
On learning this Camilla took the veil, and shortly afterwards died, worn out by grief and melancholy.
said Julie,``will you restore him to us cured of his melancholy?''
she burst into a forced and melancholy laugh, her arms stiffened and twisted, her head fell back on her chair, and she remained motionless.
The Count of Monte Cristo bowed to the five young men with a melancholy and dignified smile, and got into his carriage with Maximilian and Emmanuel.
The despairing way in which my mother and I look at each other, as I blunder on, is truly melancholy.
The doctor's opinion was that melancholy and depression were bringing him to his end.
The following July (1624), he died, reportedly from melancholy.
The gentle rain which waters my beans and keeps me in the house today is not drear and melancholy, but good for me too.
The song deals with melancholy and suicide.
Their lyrics are often touched by melancholy and tell about every-day issues.
There can be no very black melancholy to him who lives in the midst of Nature and has his senses still.
There were neither wharves nor houses on the melancholy waste of road near the great blank Prison.
This is the reason why most dyspeptic religionists cherish such melancholy notions about their hereafters.
Though "remote", we are neither "unfriended", "melancholy", nor (I may add) "slow".
when the smoke is blown away and the vapor condensed, it will be perceived that a few are riding, but the rest are run over and it will be called, and will be,``A melancholy accident.''
`I was, indeed,'said the stranger, with a tone of sweet melancholy, and with the sonorous voice peculiar to the East.''
``Ah, my time is not valuable,''replied the man with a melancholy smile.
``But melancholy,''interrupted Master Edward, snatching the feathers out of the tail of a splendid parroquet that was screaming on its gilded perch, in order to make a plume for his hat.
``I am going on a journey, dear child,''said Monte Cristo, with an expression of infinite tenderness and melancholy;``and if any misfortune should happen to me.''
``I do not know whether the wine of Chios produces melancholy, but certainly everything appears to me black in this house,''said Debray.
``My friend,''said Monte Cristo, with an expression of melancholy equal to his own,``listen to me.
``Pray do, my dear Miss Lucas,''she added in a melancholy tone,``for nobody is on my side, nobody takes part with me.

More Vocab Words

::: insatiable - not easily satisfied; unquenchable; Ex. insatiable appetite
::: conduit - aqueduct; passageway for fluids
::: archives - public records; place where public records are kept
::: collateral - security given for loan; ADJ: secondary; descended from the same person but through different sons or daughters
::: stygian - unpleasantly dark; gloomy; hellish; deathly; CF. Styx: the chief river in the subterranean land of the dead
::: microcosm - small representative world; world in miniature; Ex. microcosm of English society
::: wispy - thin; slight; barely discernible
::: podiatrist - doctor who treats ailments of the feet; chiropodist; N. podiatrics
::: chafe - warm by rubbing; make sore by rubbing; N.
::: missile - object to be thrown or projected