Vocabulary Builder

Vocabulary Builder

    Improve Your Writing

  • Boost your vocabulary
  • See words in the context of real sentences
  • Learn by association and by definition
  • Master a new lexicon!

Get Started Below

Vocabulary Word

Word: juncture

Definition: crisis; point in time; joining point; joint; act of joining


Sentences Containing 'juncture'

'Mr. Copperfield,' returned Mr. Micawber, 'your confidence is not, at the existing juncture, ill-bestowed.
After managing the fur trade at Fort McPherson, he returned to the Bell River, and followed the Porcupine to its juncture with Yukon River, the eventual site of Fort Yukon.
All Lothario's good sense seems to have failed him at this juncture; all his prudent maxims escaped his memory; for without once reflecting rationally, and without more ado, in his impatience and in the blindness of the jealous rage that gnawed his heart, and dying to revenge himself upon Camilla, who had done him no wrong, before Anselmo had risen he hastened to him and said to him, "Know, Anselmo, that for several days past I have been struggling with myself, striving to withhold from thee what it is no longer possible or right that I should conceal from thee.
And as I have been always told, and found true by experience in my travels, that flying or discovering fear before a fierce animal, is a certain way to make it pursue or attack you, so I resolved, in this dangerous juncture, to show no manner of concern.
As of June 1956, SOBRI had 39,936 registered members (However, SOBRI itself claimed to have 125,325 members at this juncture).
At about the same time, Robert Campbell, coming from Fort Simpson explored a large part of the southern Yukon and established Fort Frances (1842) on Frances Lake in the Liard River basin and Fort Selkirk, Yukon (1848) at the juncture of the Yukon River and the Pelly River.
At that juncture, excuses are generated for not confronting ourselves, excuses for a future group that we no longer believed in as we did in the past. To end for the health of the band is, in its redundancy, to enforce value to our mental health and above all to show respect for all of our fans who followed us for such a long time.
At this difficult juncture in history the CPP and Major Ishaque's MKP group (one of three factions resulting from a split in the MKP in 1978) came together to engage in criticism and self-criticism and form the Communist Mazdoor Kissan Party.
At this juncture in history of Sri Lanka almost all the schools in the country were run by Christian missionaries.
At this juncture the King's troops, under Lord Hopton, marched to the House and assisted in strengthening the works.
At this juncture the Pequod's keels had shot by the three German boats last lowered; but from the great start he had had, Derick's boat still led the chase, though every moment neared by his foreign rivals.
At this juncture Waterboer offered to place the territory under the administration of Queen Victoria.
At this juncture, Balachandran joins the job at the Secretariat.
At this juncture, Ganesh catches a glimpse of a woman named Keerthi (Trisha), and immediately falls in love with her.
At this juncture, however, Sialeeds defects to Gizel's side, spiriting Lymsleia away and prolonging the conflict. Lyon is seriously wounded, preventing the party from pursuing Lymsleia.
At this juncture, Sridhar comes to know that Preeti was staying just behind his house, when her parents come to his house to inform that she is getting married.
At this juncture, Xiao Lixia (Rebecca Lim), enters his life.
At which juncture, he exclaimed, in a voice of dire exasperation:``Bust me, if she ain't at it agin!''
But having in my life perused many state-trials, which I ever observed to terminate as the judges thought fit to direct, I durst not rely on so dangerous a decision, in so critical a juncture, and against such powerful enemies.
Each episode begins with a cold open that seldom contains a dramatic juncture.
Greece lies at the juncture of Europe, Asia and Africa.
Had you stepped on board the Pequod at a certain juncture of this post-mortemizing of the whale; and had you strolled forward nigh the windlass, pretty sure am I that you would have scanned with no small curiosity a very strange, enigmatical object, which you would have seen there, lying along lengthwise in the lee scuppers.
In October 1920, as he formed the Communist Party of India, he contacted his erstwhile revolutionary colleagues who, at this juncture, were hesitating between Radicalism ("Jugantar") and Mohandas K. Gandhi's novel programme.
It must be excited by nature, like all other sentiments; and must arise from the particular situation, in which the mind is placed at any particular juncture.
It was curious and not unpleasing, how Peleg and Bildad were affected at this juncture, especially Captain Bildad.
Murrell's Row was a red-light district of Atlanta "starting at the juncture of Line, Decatur and Peachtree streets" (i.e. at today's Five Points "and running back towards Pryor on Decatur street".
Note also where the upper eyelid comes against the flesh under the eyebrow -LRB- usually a strongly marked fold -RRB- and the differences of planes that occur at this juncture.
Now, inclusive of the occasional wide intervals between the revolving outer circles, and inclusive of the spaces between the various pods in any one of those circles, the entire area at this juncture, embraced by the whole multitude, must have contained at least two or three square miles.
Perhaps many travellers have not been under greater difficulties and distress than I was at this juncture, expecting every moment to see my box dashed to pieces, or at least overset by the first violent blast, or rising wave.
Situated at the juncture of Eastern Europe and Western Asia, it is bounded to the west by the Black Sea, to the north by Russia, to the south by Turkey and Armenia, and to the east by Azerbaijan. Georgia covers a territory of 69,700 km² and its population is 4.385 million.
Soon after, Alexander Hunter Murray established trading posts at Lapierre House (1846) and at Fort Yukon (1847) at the juncture of the Porcupine and Yukon Rivers.
That was Mr. Micawber's expression, "Provided for."' Mr. Micawber looking up at this juncture to where we were standing, I had only time to repeat my caution.
The Knitting Done In that same juncture of time when the Fifty Two awaited their fate Madame Defarge held darkly ominous council with The Vengeance and Jacques Three of the Revolutionary Jury.
The Samoan crisis came to a critical juncture in March 1889 when all three colonial contenders sent warships into Apia harbour, and a larger-scale war seemed imminent, until a massive storm on 15 March 1889 damaged or destroyed the warships, ending the military conflict. Robert Louis Stevenson arrived in Samoa in 1889 and built a house at Vailima.
The southern route started at Fort Liard, Northwest Territories, then westward along the Liard River to Frances Lake and then along the Pelly River to its juncture with Yukon River.
There were no Civil War battles fought in Illinois, but Cairo, at the juncture of the Ohio River with the Mississippi River, became an important Union supply base, protected by Camp Defiance.
UN is currently at a critical juncture in the history of nations."
Years later, Zeta Bosio would reflect on this juncture: The democracy produced the adrenalin of something new, something was occurring, I knew I was going to make changes without knowing how.

More Vocab Words

::: molecule - the smallest particle (one or more atoms) of a substance that has all the properties of that substance
::: exquisite - delicate; very finely made; extremely beautiful; Ex. exquisite piece of jewelry
::: invoke - call and bring into use (a right or law); call on/upon (a higher power or god) for help; ask for; beg for; conjure (a spirit); Ex. invoke the veto power; Ex. invoke one's advisor/God
::: inordinate - beyond reasonable limits; unrestrained; excessive; Ex. inordinate demands
::: oscillate - vibrate pendulumlike; waver
::: confine - shut in an enclosed space; restrict; keep within limits; N. confinement
::: cynical - skeptical or distrustful of human motives; N. cynicism; CF. cynic: person who believes all people are motivated by selfishness
::: crestfallen - dejected; dispirited
::: morose - ill-humored; sullen; sullenly melancholy
::: permeable - that can be permeated; penetrable; porous; allowing liquids or gas to pass through; V. permeate: spread or flow throughout; charge