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Vocabulary Word

Word: institution

Definition: instituting; (building for the) organization; established custom, practice, or relationship in a society; mental hospital; Ex. institution of marriage


Sentences Containing 'institution'

The penny post is, commonly, an institution through which you seriously offer a man that penny for his thoughts which is so often safely offered in jest.
They go and come with such regularity and precision, and their whistle can be heard so far, that the farmers set their clocks by them, and thus one well conducted institution regulates a whole country.
When I asked him if he could do without money, he showed the convenience of money in such a way as to suggest and coincide with the most philosophical accounts of the origin of this institution, and the very derivation of the word pecunia.
Of yore we had sauntered and talked, and effectually put the world behind us; for he was pledged to no institution in it, freeborn, ingenuus.
But the rich man not to make any invidious comparison is always sold to the institution which makes him rich.
This may be to judge my neighbors harshly; for I believe that many of them are not aware that they have such an institution as the jail in their village.
Statesmen and legislators, standing so completely within the institution, never distinctly and nakedly behold it.
Uncle Mumford said it had as high a reputation for thoroughness as any similar institution in Missouri!
It is believed that in all these eighteen years that have elapsed since the institution of the corpse watch, no shrouded occupant of the Bavarian dead houses has ever rung its bell.
In the West and South they have a new institution the Broom Brigade.
He had not visited the penitentiary, but he had sent a copy of the illustrious letter to the chaplain of that institution, and accompanied it with apparently inquiries.
Before the institution of coined money, however, unless they went through this tedious and difficult operation, people must always have been liable to the grossest frauds and impositions; and instead of a pound weight of pure silver, or pure copper, might receive, in exchange for their goods, an adulterated composition of the coarsest and cheapest materials, which had, however, in their outward appearance, been made to resemble those metals.
It might probably have continued to take place, too, with regard to corn, had not the institution of the public fiars put an end to it.
This institution rendered it sufficiently safe for the tenant, and much more convenient for the landlord, to convert, as they call it, the corn rent, rather at what should happen to be the price of the fiars of each year, than at any certain fixed price.
To encourage tillage, by keeping up the price of corn, even in the most plentiful years, was the avowed end of the institution.
What may have been the effects of this institution upon the agriculture of the country, I shall endeavour to explain hereafter, when I come to treat particularly of bounties.
They are said, likewise, to have been more abundant before the institution of those currencies.
The law of primogeniture, therefore, came to take place, not immediately indeed, but in process of time, in the succession of landed estates, for the same reason that it has generally taken place in that of monarchies, though not always at their first institution.
Neither their substitutions, nor fidei commisses, bear any resemblance to entails, though some French lawyers have thought proper to dress the modern institution in the language and garb of those ancient ones.
It is from this period, according to the French antiquarians, that we are to date the institution of the magistrates and councils of cities in France.
But though this institution necessarily tended to strengthen the authority of the king, and to weaken that of the great proprietors, it could not do either sufficiently for establishing order and good government among the inhabitants of the country; because it could not alter sufficiently that state of property and manners from which the disorders arose.
After the institution of feudal subordination, the king was as incapable of restraining the violence of the great lords as before.
Public utility, however, and not revenue, was the original object of this institution.
This general rule, however, is liable to a great number of exceptions; and the doctrine of drawbacks has become a much less simple matter than it was at their first institution.
But though the carrying trade certainly deserves no peculiar encouragement, though the motive of the institution was, perhaps, abundantly foolish, the institution itself seems reasonable enough.
But neither the bounty, it is evident, nor any other human institution, can have any such effect.
And though the tax, which that institution imposes upon the whole body of the people, may be very burdensome to those who pay it, it is of very little advantage to those who receive it.
By the one institution, they secured to themselves the monopoly of the home market, and by the other they endeavoured to prevent that market from ever being overstocked with their commodity.
In this very simple institution consisted the whole expense which any Grecian state seems ever to have been at, in preparing its citizens for war.
The necessary instability of such a fund seems, however, to render it an improper one for the maintenance of an institution which ought to last for ever.
The coinage, another institution for facilitating commerce, in many countries, not only defrays its own expense, but affords a small revenue or a seignorage to the sovereign.
The post-office, another institution for the same purpose, over and above defraying its own expense, affords, in almost all countries, a very considerable revenue to the sovereign.
If mean and improper persons are frequently appointed trustees; and if proper courts of inspection and account have not yet been established for controlling their conduct, and for reducing the tolls to what is barely sufficient for executing the work to be done by them; the recency of the institution both accounts and apologizes for those defects, of which, by the wisdom of parliament, the greater part may, in due time, be gradually remedied.
The protection of trade, in general, from pirates and freebooters, is said to have given occasion to the first institution of the duties of customs.
In 1730, their affairs were in so great disorder, that they were altogether incapable of maintaining their forts and garrisons, the sole purpose and pretext of their institution.
It was now reduced and confined to the original purpose of its institution.
II.--Of the Expense of the Institution for the Education of Youth.
The expense of a riding school is so great, that in most places it is a public institution.
What was taught in the greater part of those universities was suitable to the end of their institution, either theology, or something that was merely preparatory to theology.
The former part of this institution, as long as it remained in vigour, seems to have been productive of nothing but disorder and confusion, and to have tended equally to corrupt the morals both of the clergy and of the people.
The institution never flagged for want of a story, I am certain; and the wine lasted out almost as well as the matter.
So I took the key of the house to the landlord, who was very glad to get it; and the beds were sent over to the King's Bench, except mine, for which a little room was hired outside the walls in the neighbourhood of that Institution, very much to my satisfaction, since the Micawbers and I had become too used to one another, in our troubles, to part.
Taking that part of the Commons which happened to be nearest to us--for our man was unmarried by this time, and we were out of Court, and strolling past the Prerogative Office--I submitted that I thought the Prerogative Office rather a queerly managed institution.
And the institution of the family, and the emotions that arise therein, the fierce jealousy, the tenderness for offspring, parental self-devotion, all found their justification and support in the imminent dangers of the young.
There are the names, in the sweet old visionary connexion, David Copperfield and Dora Spenlow; and there, in the corner, is that Parental Institution, the Stamp Office, which is so benignantly interested in the various transactions of human life, looking down upon our Union; and there is the Archbishop of Canterbury invoking a blessing on us in print, and doing it as cheap as could possibly be expected.
I observe among you some lines of an institution, which, in its original, might have been tolerable, but these half erased, and the rest wholly blurred and blotted by corruptions.
But the rich man--not to make any invidious comparison--is always sold to the institution which makes him rich.
I was put into a jail once on this account, for one night; and, as I stood considering the walls of solid stone, two or three feet thick, the door of wood and iron, a foot thick, and the iron grating which strained the light, I could not help being struck with the foolishness of that institution which treated me as if I were mere flesh and blood and bones, to be locked up.
This may be to judge my neighbors harshly; for I believe that many of them are not aware that they have such an institution as the jail in their village.
Statesmen and legislators, standing so completely within the institution, never distinctly and nakedly behold it.

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