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Vocabulary Word

Word: incredulity

Definition: tendency to disbelief


Sentences Containing 'incredulity'

"Oh, yes, I am not joking," he continued, seeing my look of incredulity.
Again his astonishment was obvious; and he looked at her with an expression of mingled incredulity and mortification.
As similar intrigues are not uncommon in Italy, if we may credit travellers, the comtess did not manifest the least incredulity, but congratulated Albert on his success.
At one point Neil suggests they go to lectures, but the idea is met with incredulity by his housemates.
Edmond thought he was in a dream he wavered between incredulity and joy.
He even looked at her with a smile of affected incredulity.
He represented an elemental force obscuring the details of his technique and the highest tribute he received was the gasp of incredulity frequently emitted by the crowd as the ball passed from his hand to the distant wicket-keeper".
If all these tokens are not enough to vindicate the truth of what I say, here is my sword, that will compel incredulity itself to give credence to it."
In 1800, he was commissioned an Incredulity of St.
In Havana, watchers applaud ecstatically; in London, there was the dead silence of mass incredulity."
It's more than interesting to watch those who've seen them live attempt to convert those who keep their look of bemusement and incredulity intact during the discourse.
So far as what there may be of a narrative in this book; and, indeed, as indirectly touching one or two very interesting and curious particulars in the habits of sperm whales, the foregoing chapter, in its earlier part, is as important a one as will be found in this volume; but the leading matter of it requires to be still further and more familiarly enlarged upon, in order to be adequately understood, and moreover to take away any incredulity which a profound ignorance of the entire subject may induce in some minds, as to the natural verity of the main points of this affair.
So that when I shall hereafter detail to you all the specialities and concentrations of potency everywhere lurking in this expansive monster; when I shall show you some of his more inconsiderable braining feats; I trust you will have renounced all ignorant incredulity, and be ready to abide by this; that though the Sperm Whale stove a passage through the Isthmus of Darien, and mixed the Atlantic with the Pacific, you would not elevate one hair of your eye-brow.
The "Scotsman" review of the novel said, "To his credit, Faulks has imitated the haphazard plotting, sloppy characterisation, Colonel Blimp politics, sexist guff and basic incredulity of Ian Fleming to a tee.
The gentleman, however, seeing perhaps the look of incredulity upon my face, opened a pocket-book and took out a note.
The... business-like air of the fairy, the incredulity of Foggerty, and the means by which a charm is made to work through a pill and a draught — all these combine to render this unique scene irresistibly ludicrous.
``Come,''said Boville, with a tone of entire incredulity,``five millions to that gentleman who just left, and who bowed to me as though he knew me?''
``You persist in your incredulity, Edmond,''continued Faria.

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