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Vocabulary Word

Word: imply

Definition: suggest a meaning not expressed; signify


Sentences Containing 'imply'

Madame Defarge slightly waved her hand, to imply that she heard, and might be relied upon to arrive in good time, and so went through the mud, and round the corner of the prison wall.
The very simplicity and nakedness of man's life in the primitive ages imply this advantage, at least, that they left him still but a sojourner in nature.
Having said this, the abbe bowed to imply he wished to pursue his studies.
Noirtier's eye remained fixed and firm, as if to imply that a promise did not suffice; then it passed from his face to his hands.
This announcement, which implied or appeared to imply, the approval of all the persons concerned in this momentous affair, had been preceded by a scene to which our readers must be admitted.
Danglars bent his head, which he meant to imply,``Very well.''
To reduce very much the number of his servants, to reform his table from great profusion to great frugality, to lay down his equipage after he has once set it up, are changes which cannot escape the observation of his neighbours, and which are supposed to imply some acknowledgment of preceding bad conduct.
But such a case would imply that one form had remained for a very long period unaltered, whilst its descendants had undergone a vast amount of change; and the principle of competition between organism and organism, between child and parent, will render this a very rare event; for in all cases the new and improved forms of life tend to supplant the old and unimproved forms.
In the writings of Professor Owen we continually meet with the expression of generalised forms, as applied to extinct animals; and in the writings of Agassiz, of prophetic or synthetic types; and these terms imply that such forms are, in fact, intermediate or connecting links.
Expressions such as that famous one by Linnaeus, which we often meet with in a more or less concealed form, namely, that the characters do not make the genus, but that the genus gives the characters, seem to imply that some deeper bond is included in our classifications than mere resemblance.
The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality.
Were it demonstratively false, it would imply a contradiction, and could never be distinctly conceived by the mind.
And she had a disagreeable consciousness of not appearing to imply that it had been an overpowering pleasure.
How dare you to insinuate that you don't know my character better than your words imply?'
I could see by his manner that he had stronger reasons for satisfaction than his words alone would imply.
I had no fear for the future, I said--and I laid great emphasis on that, as if to imply that I should still be decidedly eligible for a son-in-law one of these days--but, for the present, I was thrown upon my own resources.

More Vocab Words

::: qualify - reach a necessary standard; limit the meaning of something stated
::: alloy - mixture as of metals; something added that lowers in value or purity; V: mix; make less pure; lower in value or quality; spoil; CF. unalloyed: not in mixture with other maetals; pure; complete; unqualified; Ex. unalloyed happiness
::: filch - steal (things of small value)
::: affliction - state of distress; trial; cause of distress or suffering; V. afflict: inflict grievous suffering on
::: problematic - causing a problem; open to doubt; doubtful; unsettled; questionable; Ex. Whether the arena will ever be completed is problematic.
::: billowing - swelling out in waves; surging
::: muted - silent; muffled; toned down; Ex. muted traffic noise
::: proletarian - member of the working class; blue collar guy; N. proletariat: working class (who have to work for wages)
::: headfirst - moving with the head leading; headlong
::: application - diligent attention; diligence; V. apply oneself