Vocabulary Builder

Vocabulary Builder

    Improve Your Writing

  • Boost your vocabulary
  • See words in the context of real sentences
  • Learn by association and by definition
  • Master a new lexicon!

Get Started Below

Vocabulary Word

Word: implausible

Definition: unlikely (to be true); unbelievable; Ex. implausible alibi


Sentences Containing 'implausible'

"Time Out" film reviews wrote of the film, "Directed by Fleischer with tight, spare energy, although the implausible script and bland leading performances (with Hale as the dead friend's wife, initially hostile but soon losing her heart) make it much inferior to "The Narrow Margin"."
Alternatively, the entire account of the guard and the chief priests can be discounted as likely to be an ahistorical addition written by Matthew to make the stolen body hypothesis appear implausible.
Apologists also doubt that the disciples could possibly have sneaked past a Roman guard at a sealed tomb, and that attacking the guards would be even more implausible.
Apologists consider it implausible that grave robbers would risk robbing a guarded tomb when surely many unguarded ones existed.
But the highlight of the film was portraying "how liberating and joyous forgiveness is—both giving it and receiving it—without putting implausible, sermonizing dialogue into their characters' mouths."
His audience rapidly showed a preference for implausible adventures, however, and the movement away from Gernsback's idealism accelerated when the magazine changed hands in 1929.
The cover story she purportedly used to leave Philadelphia—she was filling a flour sack at a nearby mill outside the British lines because there was a flour shortage in the city—is implausible because there was no shortage and a lone woman would not have been allowed to roam around at night, least of all in the area between the armies.
Yet Jones also reports that Freud emphatically denied that Nietzsche's writings influenced his own psychological discoveries; in the 1890s, Freud, whose education at the University of Vienna in the 1870s had included a strong relationship with Franz Brentano, his teacher in philosophy, from whom he had acquired an enthusiasm for Aristotle and Ludwig Feuerbach, was acutely aware of the possibility of convergence of his own ideas with those of Nietzsche and doggedly refused to read the philosopher as a result. In his excoriating - but also sympathetic - critique of psychoanalysis, "The Psychoanalytic Movement", Ernest Gellner depicts Nietzsche as setting out the conditions for elaborating a realistic psychology, in contrast with the eccentrically implausible Enlightenment psychology of Hume and Smith, and assesses the success of Freud and the psychoanalytic movement as in large part based upon its success in meeting this "Nietzschean minimum".

More Vocab Words

::: ethos - underlying character of a culture, group, etc.; character or ideas peculiar to a specific person, group, or culture; Ex. the company ethos
::: rhapsodize - speak or write in an exaggeratedly enthusiastic manner; Ex. rhapsodize over the beauty of the scenery
::: slake - satisfy (thirst); quench; sate
::: exploit - make use of, sometimes unjustly; N. exploitation
::: usurp - seize another's power or rank (without legal authority); supplant; appropriate; N. usurpation; CF. take for one's own use
::: crochet - make (a piece of needlework) by looping thread with a hooked needle; N. CF. crotchet
::: visage - face; appearance
::: scapegoat - someone who bears the blame for others; whipping boy; CF. escape+goat
::: husbandry - frugality; thrift; economy; agriculture; farming; Ex. animal husbandry; CF. husbandman
::: calligraphy - beautiful writing; excellent penmanship