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Vocabulary Word

Word: hoard

Definition: stockpile; accumulate for future use; N: supply stored for future use


Sentences Containing 'hoard'

By and bye, when the military camp broke up, and Company C was ordered a hundred miles north, to Napoleon, I secreted my small hoard of money in my belt, and took my departure in the night.
In this way he acquired a vast hoard of all sorts of learning, and had it pigeon holed in his head where he could put his intellectual hand on it whenever it was wanted.
They could not well, indeed, do any thing else but hoard whatever money they saved.
In those times of violence and disorder, besides, it was convenient to have a hoard of money at hand, that in case they should be driven from their own home, they might have something of known value to carry with them to some place of safety.
The same violence which made it convenient to hoard, made it equally convenient to conceal the hoard.
The frequency of treasure-trove, or of treasure found, of which no owner was known, sufficiently demonstrates the frequency, in those times, both of hoarding and of concealing the hoard.
The individuals, who hoard whatever money they can save, and who conceal their hoard, do so from a distrust of the justice of government; from a fear, that if it was known that they had a hoard, and where that hoard was to be found, they would quickly be plundered.
Begone from my presence, thou born monster, storehouse of lies, hoard of untruths, garner of knaveries, inventor of scandals, publisher of absurdities, enemy of the respect due to royal personages!
He asked the gentlemen who they were, whither they were going, and what money they carried with them; "Senor," replied one of them, "we are two captains of Spanish infantry; our companies are at Naples, and we are on our way to embark in four galleys which they say are at Barcelona under orders for Sicily; and we have about two or three hundred crowns, with which we are, according to our notions, rich and contented, for a soldier's poverty does not allow a more extensive hoard."
The pilgrims were about to give up the whole of their little hoard, but Roque bade them keep quiet, and turning to his men he said, "Of these crowns two fall to each man and twenty remain over; let ten be given to these pilgrims, and the other ten to this worthy squire that he may be able to speak favourably of this adventure;" and then having writing materials, with which he always went provided, brought to him, he gave them in writing a safe-conduct to the leaders of his bands; and bidding them farewell let them go free and filled with admiration at his magnanimity, his generous disposition, and his unusual conduct, and inclined to regard him as an Alexander the Great rather than a notorious robber.
He rushes to some secret hoard, where he has accumulated the fruits of his beggary, and he stuffs all the coins upon which he can lay his hands into the pockets to make sure of the coat's sinking.

More Vocab Words

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::: erroneous - mistaken; wrong; incorrect
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::: inherent - firmly established by nature or habit; intrinsic
::: prong - pointed projecting part
::: decadence - decay; fall to a lower level (of morality, civilization, or art); ADJ. decadent
::: comestible - something fit to be eaten
::: carefree - free from worries; having no problems
::: fluctuate - waver; shift; rise and fall as if in waves; change or vary irregularly
::: derivative - unoriginal; obtained from another source; Ex. derivative prose style; N.