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Vocabulary Word

Word: gregarious

Definition: sociable; (of an animal) tending to form a group


Sentences Containing 'gregarious'

"A Gregarious Culture" identifies "the only known copy of the first edition" of the book as "a treasure" of the Mitchell Library at State Library of New South Wales.
According to "A Gregarious Culture" (2001), "sales of "The Mystery of a Hansom Cab", published in 1886, would reach astronomical figures".
At his death, Premier David Bartlett noted that he was "decent, honest, straightforward and committed to helping Tasmanians," while Don Wing said that he was "gregarious, passionate but above all a gentleman."
During the breeding season it is solitary but at other times of year it is gregarious.
Even now I am certain that those seas are not, and perhaps never can be, in the present constitution of things, a place for his habitual gregarious resort.
Fruiting bodies are typically gregarious (growing together in groups, but not joined together).
It can be solitary or gregarious, and has been known to perform seemingly playful behavior.
It is a gregarious animal which roosts with hundreds or thousands of individuals.
It is a gregarious, diurnal bird and small flocks forage for seed and other vegetable matter on the ground, flying once a day to a waterhole for water.
It is gregarious and several individuals may rest together.
Like most gulls, it is highly gregarious in winter, both when feeding or in evening roosts.
Nevertheless, his personal charm and gregarious manner enabled him to form lasting friendships in the cricketing and musical worlds, with among others Newman, Sir Thomas Beecham and Sir Donald Bradman.
The latter is notable for its typically British self-deprecating autobiography: "Gwyn describes himself as enthusiastic, lazy, persistent, creative, fat, well-educated, pedantic, polite, greedy, gentle, prejudiced, kind, unreliable, well-meaning, curious, shy, gregarious, snobbish, confident, cowardly, optimistic, comfortable, irritable, at ease, nervous, thirsty, tired, willing, competent, unselfconscious, spry, hard-working, querulous, prolix and cheerful.
The Pied Starling is gregarious and when not breeding will form large flocks, sometimes numbering more than 1000 birds.
The Rosy Starling is a colonial breeder, and like other starlings, is highly gregarious, forming large winter flocks.
The Yellow-crowned Canary is a common and gregarious seedeater.
They are highly gregarious, with colonies numbering in the thousands of individuals.
They both looked to the right and to the left into most of the shops they passed, had a wary eye for all gregarious assemblages of people, and turned out of their road to avoid any very excited group of talkers.
This species is gregarious, occurring in groupings of up to a dozen birds, though occasionally birds can be seen alone.
Though the gregarious sperm whales have their regular seasons for particular grounds, yet in general you cannot conclude that the herds which haunted such and such a latitude or longitude this year, say, will turn out to be identically the same with those that were found there the preceding season; though there are peculiar and unquestionable instances where the contrary of this has proved true.
Unlike some kingfishers, it is quite gregarious, and forms large roosts at night.
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