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Vocabulary Word

Word: gradation

Definition: series of gradual stages; degree in such a progression


Sentences Containing 'gradation'

Look carefully at the shape and variety of the tone you wish to express, and try and manipulate the swing of your brush in such a way as to get in one touch as near the quality of shape and gradation you want.
XIII VARIETY OF MASS The masses that go to make up a picture have variety in their#shape#, their#tone values#, their#edges#, in#texture#or#quality#, and in#gradation#.
#This quality of tone music is most dominant when the masses are large and simple#, when the contemplation of them is not disturbed by much variety, and they have little variation of texture and gradation.
Variety of gradation will naturally be governed largely by the form and light and shade of the objects in your composition.
``I will name to you several sums which will increase by gradation; you will stop me when I reach the one representing the amount of your own possessions?''
It is so in every gradation of despotism, from that of the gentle and mild government of Paris, to that of the violent and furious government of Constantinople.
Lamarck seems to have been chiefly led to his conclusion on the gradual change of species, by the difficulty of distinguishing species and varieties, by the almost perfect gradation of forms in certain groups, and by the analogy of domestic productions.
He argues from the analogy of domestic productions, from the changes which the embryos of many species undergo, from the difficulty of distinguishing species and varieties, and from the principle of general gradation, that species have been modified; and he attributes the modification to the change of circumstances.
The author (1855) has also treated Psychology on the principle of the necessary acquirement of each mental power and capacity by gradation.
We have some evidence of this gradation of habit; for, as Schiodte remarks: "We accordingly look upon the subterranean faunas as small ramifications which have penetrated into the earth from the geographically limited faunas of the adjacent tracts, and which, as they extended themselves into darkness, have been accommodated to surrounding circumstances.
In fishes and reptiles, as Owen has remarked, "The range of gradation of dioptric structures is very great."
This subject is intimately connected with that of the gradation of the characters, often accompanied by a change of function, for instance, the conversion of a swim-bladder into lungs, points which were discussed in the last chapter under two headings.
The gradation extends even to the manner in which ordinary spines and the pedicellariae, with their supporting calcareous rods, are articulated to the shell.
Thus every gradation, from an ordinary fixed spine to a fixed pedicellariae, would be of service.
Let us look to the great principle of gradation, and see whether Nature does not reveal to us her method of work.
It is surprising in how many curious ways this gradation can be shown; but only the barest outline of the facts can here be given.
From this absolute zero of fertility, the pollen of different species applied to the stigma of some one species of the same genus, yields a perfect gradation in the number of seeds produced, up to nearly complete or even quite complete fertility; and, as we have seen, in certain abnormal cases, even to an excess of fertility, beyond that which the plant's own pollen produces.
Why does not every collection of fossil remains afford plain evidence of the gradation and mutation of the forms of life?
I have attempted to show how much light the principle of gradation throws on the admirable architectural powers of the hive-bee.
Psychology will be securely based on the foundation already well laid by Mr. Herbert Spencer, that of the necessary acquirement of each mental power and capacity by gradation.
For if this should be denied, it is possible, by the continual gradation of shades, to run a colour insensibly into what is most remote from it; and if you will not allow any of the means to be different, you cannot, without absurdity, deny the extremes to be the same.
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