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Vocabulary Word

Word: foster

Definition: rear; bring up (for a certain period only); encourage; promote the development of (feelings or ideas); Ex. help foster friendly relations; ADJ: giving parental care although not related by blood; Ex. foster parents


Sentences Containing 'foster'

It is true that the indulgence of his foster mother encouraged him.
`Sir,'replied Haidee,`the Count of Monte Cristo, my foster father, has been in Normandy the last three days.'''
You were speaking of the Champs Elysees just now, worthy foster father.''
But as that old foster-father in the comedy, being now to take his leave doth with a great deal of ceremony, require his foster-child's rhombus, or rattle-top, remembering nevertheless that it is but a rhombus; so here also do thou likewise.
Thirdly, that the young cuckoo, soon after birth, has the instinct, the strength and a properly shaped back for ejecting its foster-brothers, which then perish from cold and hunger.
This has been boldly called a beneficent arrangement, in order that the young cuckoo may get sufficient food, and that its foster-brothers may perish before they had acquired much feeling!
Now, if it had been of an advantage to this species to have laid eggs even smaller than those now laid, so as to have deceived certain foster-parents, or, as is more probable, to have been hatched within a shorter period (for it is asserted that there is a relation between the size of eggs and the period of their incubation), then there is no difficulty in believing that a race or species might have been formed which would have laid smaller and smaller eggs; for these would have been more safely hatched and reared.
But he has now received a trustworthy account of a young cuckoo which was actually seen, while still blind and not able even to hold up its own head, in the act of ejecting its foster-brothers.
They often lay so many eggs--from fifteen to twenty--in the same foster-nest, that few or none can possibly be hatched.
They have, moreover, the extraordinary habit of pecking holes in the eggs, whether of their own species or of their foster parents, which they find in the appropriated nests.
Finally, it may not be a logical deduction, but to my imagination it is far more satisfactory to look at such instincts as the young cuckoo ejecting its foster-brothers, ants making slaves, the larvae of ichneumonidae feeding within the live bodies of caterpillars, not as specially endowed or created instincts, but as small consequences of one general law leading to the advancement of all organic beings--namely, multiply, vary, let the strongest live and the weakest die.
The passion for philosophy, like that for religion, seems liable to this inconvenience, that, though it aims at the correction of our manners, and extirpation of our vices, it may only serve, by imprudent management, to foster a predominant inclination, and push the mind, with more determined resolution, towards that side which already _draws_ too much, by the bias and propensity of the natural temper.
So pretty soon he says: "The man that bought him is named Abram Foster--Abram G.
Foster--and he lives forty mile back here in the country, on the road to Lafayette."
"So clear out," he says; "and you can tell Mr. Foster whatever you want to.
Born of earth, yet suckled by the sea; though hill and valley mothered me, ye billows are my foster-brothers!"

More Vocab Words

::: ingenuous - naive and trusting; young; unsophisticated; candid
::: austere - forbiddingly stern; ascetic; without comfort or enjoyment; severely simple and unornamented; Ex. a monk's austere life; Ex. austere grandeur of the cathedral; N. austerity
::: orthography - correct spelling; CF. ortho-: straight; correct; Ex. orthodontics
::: debut - d\'ebut; first public appearance; formal presentation of a young woman to society
::: indecisive - marked by indecision; inconclusive; Ex. indecisive battle
::: ceremonious - marked by formality; extremely formal and polite; CF. ceremony: conventional social courtesy
::: homespun - domestic; made at home; spun or woven at home; simple and ordinary; Ex. homespun philosophy
::: imperturbable - unshakably calm; placid
::: nomadic - wandering; N. nomad: tribe who migrates from place to place
::: lithe - flexible; supple; CF. limber