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Vocabulary Word

Word: flora

Definition: plants of a region or era


Sentences Containing 'flora'

Never had Flora, the fresh and smiling goddess of gardeners, been honored with a purer or more scrupulous worship than that which was paid to her in this little enclosure.
Hence, we can understand how it is that the flora of Madeira, according to Oswald Heer, resembles to a certain extent the extinct tertiary flora of Europe.
To give a single instance: in the last edition of Dr. Asa Gray's "Manual of the Flora of the Northern United States," 260 naturalised plants are enumerated, and these belong to 162 genera.
Therefore, it would perhaps be safer to assume that the seeds of about 10/100 plants of a flora, after having been dried, could be floated across a space of sea 900 miles in width, and would then germinate.
By the time that the cold had reached its maximum, we should have an arctic fauna and flora, covering the central parts of Europe, as far south as the Alps and Pyrenees, and even stretching into Spain.
In the admirable "Introduction to the Flora of New Zealand," by Dr. Hooker, analogous and striking facts are given in regard to the plants of that large island.
Watson has remarked, "in receding from polar toward equatorial latitudes, the Alpine or mountain flora really become less and less Arctic."
The facts seem to indicate that distinct species belonging to the same genera have migrated in radiating lines from a common centre; and I am inclined to look in the southern, as in the northern hemisphere, to a former and warmer period, before the commencement of the last Glacial period, when the Antarctic lands, now covered with ice, supported a highly peculiar and isolated flora.
It may be suspected that before this flora was exterminated during the last Glacial epoch, a few forms had been already widely dispersed to various points of the southern hemisphere by occasional means of transport, and by the aid, as halting-places, of now sunken islands.
So it is with the other animals, and with a large proportion of the plants, as shown by Dr. Hooker in his admirable Flora of this archipelago.
The affinity, which, though feeble, I am assured by Dr. Hooker is real, between the flora of the south-western corner of Australia and of the Cape of Good Hope, is a far more remarkable case; but this affinity is confined to the plants, and will, no doubt, some day be explained.
If you should have anything to do with robbers, I will give you the story of Cacus, for I have it by heart; if with loose women, there is the Bishop of Mondonedo, who will give you the loan of Lamia, Laida, and Flora, any reference to whom will bring you great credit; if with hard-hearted ones, Ovid will furnish you with Medea; if with witches or enchantresses, Homer has Calypso, and Virgil Circe; if with valiant captains, Julius Caesar himself will lend you himself in his own 'Commentaries,' and Plutarch will give you a thousand Alexanders.
"And it is--" "That Miss Flora Millar, the lady who had caused the disturbance, has actually been arrested.
And she was afterwards seen walking into Hyde Park in company with Flora Millar, a woman who is now in custody, and who had already made a disturbance at Mr. Doran's house that morning."
Flora was a dear little thing, but exceedingly hot-headed and devotedly attached to me.
It is thought that Flora decoyed my wife out and laid some terrible trap for her."
"At some evidence implicating Flora Millar in the disappearance."
Now my theory all along has been that Lady St. Simon was decoyed away by Flora Millar, and that she, with confederates, no doubt, was responsible for her disappearance.

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::: augury - omen; prophecy; sign of coming events; V. augur: predict; foretell; be a sign of (something in future)
::: primp - groom oneself with care; adorn oneself
::: berserk - mad with violent anger; frenzied; madly excited
::: jovial - good-natured; merry; cheerful
::: betroth - become engaged to marry
::: bequeath - leave to someone by means of a will; hand down in his will; N. bequest
::: covetous - avaricious; desirous of (someone else's possessions); V. covet: desire eagerly (someone else's possessions)
::: threadbare - worn through till the threads show; shabby and poor; hackneyed; Ex. threadbare excuses
::: estimable - (of a person) worthy of esteem; admirable; deserving esteem; possible to estimate