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Vocabulary Word

Word: fanaticism

Definition: excessive zeal; extreme devotion to a belief or cause; N. fanatic; ADJ. fanatic


Sentences Containing 'fanaticism'

Diderot saw the convulsionnaire phenomenon as not only a "sect of fools," but as the link between female nervous disorders and religious fanaticism.
In 1893, a book appeared, "Four Tyrolian Child Victims of Hassidic Fanaticism" by Viennese priest Josef Deckert, and it gave new life to the legend and changed it into a format usable for a modern wave of antisemitism.
In his reign Justin at Rome became a martyr to his faith, and Polycarp at Smyrna, and we know of many outbreaks of fanaticism in the provinces which caused the death of the faithful.
It was at a moment when the city was in the last agony of violence and fanaticism.
Metamodernism is said to be defined by 'naivety', 'pragmatic idealism' and 'moderate fanaticism'.
Not every stab at religion serves the aim of struggle against it… every “persecution of that faith” builds up religious fanaticism.
The 12th party congress called for the expansion of anti-religious propaganda and warns against insulting religious feelings by 'primitive methods' and of ridiculing the objects and ceremonies of faith; claiming that these methods strengthen 'religious fanaticism'.
The clergy, in order to preserve their influence in those popular elections, became, or affected to become, many of them, fanatics themselves, encouraged fanaticism among the people, and gave the preference almost always to the most fanatical candidate.
The teachers of each little sect, finding themselves almost alone, would be obliged to respect those of almost every other sect; and the concessions which they would mutually find in both convenient and agreeable to make one to another, might in time, probably reduce the doctrine of the greater part of them to that pure and rational religion, free from every mixture of absurdity, imposture, or fanaticism, such as wise men have, in all ages of the world, wished to see established; but such as positive law has, perhaps, never yet established, and probably never will establish in any country; because, with regard to religion, positive law always has been, and probably always will be, more or less influenced by popular superstition and enthusiasm.
While the anti-hierarchical spirit of the convulsionnaire movement may have appealed to some of the philosophes, they generally looked down upon the phenomenon as a whole as emblematic of religious fanaticism.
Writing in the opinion section of "Al-Ahram Weekly", Abdel-Moneim Said called on those who mourn for Marwa El-Sherbini "not fall into the same morass of bigotry and hatred that killed her," but to "create Arab-Muslim-European fronts, together with other faiths, to stand up against fanaticism, bigotry and discrimination on both sides."
``They had, however, what supplied the place of those fine qualities,''replied the young man,``and that was fanaticism.

More Vocab Words

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::: concede - admit; acknowledge as being true (often reluctantly); yield; grant; Ex. concede a goal
::: turpitude - depravity; baseness; Ex. moral turpitude
::: archipelago - group of closely located islands
::: centrifuge - machine that separates substances by whirling them
::: camaraderie - good-fellowship; CF. comrade
::: plebeian - common; vulgar; pertaining to the common people; N: common people in ancient Rome; CF. patrician
::: matin - \'ee(matinee) dramatic or musical performance given in the afternoon
::: prohibitive - so high as to prohibit purchase or use; tending to prevent the purchase or use of something; prohibiting; inclined to prevent or forbid; Ex. prohibitive tax
::: postulate - self-evident truth; something assumed without proof; V: assume the truth of (as a basis of an argument)