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Vocabulary Word

Word: ensue

Definition: follow (as a result)


Sentences Containing 'ensue'

That such a consequence as this could ensue, you may easily believe, was far enough from my thoughts.''
No one at Villefort's doubted that a duel would ensue from it.
Think thyself fit and worthy to speak, or to do anything that is according to nature, and let not the reproach, or report of some that may ensue upon it, ever deter thee.
And as concerning death, that either dispersion, or the atoms, or annihilation, or extinction, or translation will ensue.
It is also necessary to bear in mind that, owing to the law of correlation, when one part varies and the variations are accumulated through natural selection, other modifications, often of the most unexpected nature, will ensue.
Bearing in mind that the mutual relation of organism to organism is of the highest importance, we can see why two areas, having nearly the same physical conditions, should often be inhabited by very different forms of life; for according to the length of time which has elapsed since the colonists entered one of the regions, or both; according to the nature of the communication which allowed certain forms and not others to enter, either in greater or lesser numbers; according or not as those which entered happened to come into more or less direct competition with each other and with the aborigines; and according as the immigrants were capable of varying more or less rapidly, there would ensue in the to or more regions, independently of their physical conditions, infinitely diversified conditions of life; there would be an almost endless amount of organic action and reaction, and we should find some groups of beings greatly, and some only slightly modified; some developed in great force, some existing in scanty numbers--and this we do find in the several great geographical provinces of the world.
There could be no doubt that, as it was a national possession, a horrible scandal would ensue if any misfortune should occur to it.
When the stone is put parallel to the plane of the horizon, the island stands still; for in that case the extremities of it, being at equal distance from the earth, act with equal force, the one in drawing downwards, the other in pushing upwards, and consequently no motion can ensue.
For if,” said he, “you throw among five _Yahoos_ as much food as would be sufficient for fifty, they will, instead of eating peaceably, fall together by the ears, each single one impatient to have all to itself; and therefore a servant was usually employed to stand by while they were feeding abroad, and those kept at home were tied at a distance from each other: that if a cow died of age or accident, before a _Houyhnhnm_ could secure it for his own _Yahoos_, those in the neighbourhood would come in herds to seize it, and then would ensue such a battle as I had described, with terrible wounds made by their claws on both sides, although they seldom were able to kill one another, for want of such convenient instruments of death as we had invented.
But at length, such calamities did ensue in these assaults--not restricted to sprained wrists and ankles, broken limbs, or devouring amputations--but fatal to the last degree of fatality; those repeated disastrous repulses, all accumulating and piling their terrors upon Moby Dick; those things had gone far to shake the fortitude of many brave hunters, to whom the story of the White Whale had eventually come.
But this was very far North, be it remembered, where beer agrees well with the constitution; upon the Equator, in our southern fishery, beer would be apt to make the harpooneer sleepy at the mast-head and boozy in his boat; and grievous loss might ensue to Nantucket and New Bedford.

More Vocab Words

::: gull - trick; deceive; hoodwink; N: person who is easily tricked; dupe
::: discord - conflict; lack of harmony; dissonance (when musical notes are played)
::: unintimating - unfrightening
::: uncouth - boorish; clumsy in speech or behavior; outlandish
::: vacuous - empty; lacking in ideas; inane; stupid; Ex. vacuous expression; N. vacuity
::: devise - think up; invent; plan; bequeath; N: bequest
::: prologue - introduction (to a poem or play)
::: catholic - (of likings and interests) universal; general; broad; including many different parts; wide-ranging liberal; Ex. catholic opinions/tastes
::: memento - token; reminder of the past; keepsake; Ex. memento of your visit
::: resolution - determination; resoluteness; ADJ. resolute: firm or determined in purpose