Vocabulary Builder

Vocabulary Builder

    Improve Your Writing

  • Boost your vocabulary
  • See words in the context of real sentences
  • Learn by association and by definition
  • Master a new lexicon!

Get Started Below

Vocabulary Word

Word: economy

Definition: efficiency or conciseness in using something; thrifty management of resources


Sentences Containing 'economy'

And you may be certain when I have the honor of seeing her again, I shall speak in the very highest terms of your modesty, economy, and other amiable qualification.''
When first Mr. Bennet had married, economy was held to be perfectly useless, for, of course, they were to have a son.
Mrs. Bennet had no turn for economy, and her husband's love of independence had alone prevented their exceeding their income.
It will save me a world of trouble and economy.
Such relief, however, as it was in her power to afford, by the practice of what might be called economy in her own private expences, she frequently sent them.
The possibilities for the latter are especially limited, and the invention of stoves was a great advance in efficiency, economy, and comfort.
The actual labor involved in furnace heating and in hot water heating is practically the same, since coal must be fed to the fire, and ashes must be removed; but the hot water system has the advantage of economy and cleanliness.
It is by no means unusual for the residents of a large city or town to receive through the newspapers a notification that the city water supply is running low and that economy should be exercised in its use.
In the best work the greatest economy is exercised in this respect, so that as much power may be kept in reserve as possible.
Economy is a subject which admits of being treated with levity, but it can not so be disposed of.
Even the poor student studies and is taught only political economy, while that economy of living which is synonymous with philosophy is not even sincerely professed in our colleges.
I admired anew the economy and convenience of plastering, which so effectually shuts out the cold and takes a handsome finish, and I learned the various casualties to which the plasterer is liable.
The next winter I used a small cooking stove for economy, since I did not own the forest; but it did not keep fire so well as the open fireplace.
To no class of persons is the presentation of a gratuitous opera box more acceptable than to the wealthy millionaire, who still hugs economy while boasting of carrying a king's ransom in his waistcoat pocket.
The disorders which generally prevail in the economy of the rich, naturally introduce themselves into the management of the former; the strict frugality and parsimonious attention of the poor as naturally establish themselves in that of the latter.
In several provinces of France, the feeding of poultry is considered as a very important article in rural economy, and sufficiently profitable to encourage the farmer to raise a considerable quantity of Indian corn and buckwheat for this purpose.
This notion is connected with the system of political economy, which represents national wealth as consisting in the abundance and national poverty in the scarcity, of gold and silver; a system which I shall endeavour to explain and examine at great length in the fourth book of this Inquiry.
It is the highest impertinence and presumption, therefore, in kings and ministers to pretend to watch over the economy of private people, and to restrain their expense, either by sumptuary laws, or by prohibiting the importation of foreign luxuries.
But the great object of the political economy of every country, is to increase the riches and power of that country.
The habits, besides, of order, economy, and attention, to which mercantile business naturally forms a merchant, render him much fitter to execute, with profit and success, any project of improvement.
Gold and silver, therefore, are, according to him, the must solid and substantial part of the moveable wealth of a nation; and to multiply those metals ought, he thinks, upon that account, to be the great object of its political economy.
The title of Mun's book, England's Treasure in Foreign Trade, became a fundamental maxim in the political economy, not of England only, but of all other commercial countries.
OF THE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS, OR OF THOSE SYSTEMS OF POLITICAL ECONOMY WHICH REPRESENT THE PRODUCE OF LAND, AS EITHER THE SOLE OR THE PRINCIPAL SOURCE OF THE REVENUE AND WEALTH OF EVERY COUNTRY.
He seems not to have considered, that in the political body, the natural effort which every man is continually making to better his own condition, is a principle of preservation capable of preventing and correcting, in many respects, the bad effects of a political economy, in some degree both partial and oppressive.
Such a political economy, though it no doubt retards more or less, is not always capable of stopping altogether, the natural progress of a nation towards wealth and prosperity, and still less of making it go backwards.
This sect, in their works, which are very numerous, and which treat not only of what is properly called Political Economy, or of the nature and causes or the wealth of nations, but of every other branch of the system of civil government, all follow implicitly, and without any sensible variation, the doctrine of Mr. Qttesnai.
The salaries of all the different judges, high and low, together with the whole expense of the administration and execution of justice, even where it is not managed with very good economy, makes, in any civilized country, but a very inconsiderable part of the whole expense of government.
The regular payment of his salary should not depend upon the good will, or even upon the good economy of that power.
The miserable effects of which the company complained, were the cheapness of consumption, and the encouragement given to production; precisely the two effects which it is the great business of political economy to promote.
Every part of their education tends evidently to some useful purpose; either to improve the natural attractions of their person, or to form their mind to reserve, to modesty, to chastity, and to economy; to render them both likely to became the mistresses of a family, and to behave properly when they have become such.
All these are changes from a former state into another; not destruction, but an ordered economy, a fixed administration.
Lastly, representative species fill the same place in the natural economy of each island as do the local forms and sub-species; but as they are distinguished from each other by a greater amount of difference than that between the local forms and sub-species, they are almost universally ranked by naturalists as true species.
Yet unless it be thoroughly engrained in the mind, the whole economy of nature, with every fact on distribution, rarity, abundance, extinction, and variation, will be dimly seen or quite misunderstood.
We can dimly see why the competition should be most severe between allied forms, which fill nearly the same place in the economy of nature; but probably in no one case could we precisely say why one species has been victorious over another in the great battle of life.
But in the case of an island, or of a country partly surrounded by barriers, into which new and better adapted forms could not freely enter, we should then have places in the economy of nature which would assuredly be better filled up if some of the original inhabitants were in some manner modified; for, had the area been open to immigration, these same places would have been seized on by intruders.
So in the general economy of any land, the more widely and perfectly the animals and plants are diversified for different habits of life, so will a greater number of individuals be capable of there supporting themselves.
Their modified descendants, fourteen in number at the fourteen-thousandth generation, will probably have inherited some of the same advantages: they have also been modified and improved in a diversified manner at each stage of descent, so as to have become adapted to many related places in the natural economy of their country.
Let us take a simple case: in travelling from north to south over a continent, we generally meet at successive intervals with closely allied or representative species, evidently filling nearly the same place in the natural economy of the land.
By the above singular manner of building, strength is continually given to the comb, with the utmost ultimate economy of wax.
If we forget for an instant that each species tends to increase inordinately, and that some check is always in action, yet seldom perceived by us, the whole economy of nature will be utterly obscured.
We must not, however, assume that divergence of character is a necessary contingency; it depends solely on the descendants from a species being thus enabled to seize on many and different places in the economy of nature.
I further attempted to show that from the varying descendants of each species trying to occupy as many and as different places as possible in the economy of nature, they constantly tend to diverge in character.
It might have been thought (and was in ancient times thought) that those parts of the structure which determined the habits of life, and the general place of each being in the economy of nature, would be of very high importance in classification.
But it is by no means obvious, on the ordinary view, why the structure of the embryo should be more important for this purpose than that of the adult, which alone plays its full part in the economy of nature.
And there is no reason to despair of equal success in our enquiries concerning the mental powers and economy, if prosecuted with equal capacity and caution.
Though the instinct be different, yet still it is an instinct, which teaches a man to avoid the fire; as much as that, which teaches a bird, with such exactness, the art of incubation, and the whole economy and order of its nursery.
The way she manages this place; her punctuality, domestic knowledge, economy, and order; her cheerfulness, Copperfield!'
By which the reader may conceive an idea of the ingenuity of that people, as well as the prudent and exact economy of so great a prince.
The author’s economy, and happy life, among the Houyhnhnms.
I had settled my little economy to my own heart’s content.

More Vocab Words

::: prowess - extraordinary ability; military bravery; Ex. prowess in battle
::: grimace - facial distortion to show feeling such as pain, disgust, etc; V.
::: connoisseur - person competent to act as a judge of art, etc. (whose judgments are respected); a lover of an art
::: archaic - antiquated; no longer used; belonging to the past; N.
::: millennium - thousand-year period (as in the New Testament); hoped-for period of happiness and prosperity
::: qualms - uneasy feelings; misgivings; uneasy fears especially about matters of conscience; Ex. I have no qualms about giving this assignment to Helen.
::: ductile - malleable; pliable; (of metals) easily pulled into shape; flexible; (of someone) easily influenced or controlled
::: topography - physical features of a region (such as the shape and height); CF. topo-: place
::: tautological - needlessly repetitious; Ex. ``It was visible to the eye''; N. tautology: needless repetition of the same sense; statement that is always true
::: frock - long loose garment (worn by monks)