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Vocabulary Word

Word: drama

Definition: prose or verse composition to be performed by actors; play; exciting and unusual situation


Sentences Containing 'drama'

It was a drama of many scenes and without an end.
``Amusing, certainly,''replied the young man,``inasmuch as, instead of shedding tears as at the fictitious tale of woe produced at a theater, you behold in a law court a case of real and genuine distress a drama of life.
``And what part did he play in this sad drama?''
``Because he is an actor in the drama.''
``Well,''said Beauchamp,``let them now say that drama is unnatural!''
Each formation, on this view, does not mark a new and complete act of creation, but only an occasional scene, taken almost at hazard, in an ever slowly changing drama.
This first glimpse, however, is a significant one, for it shows the early development of that love of the drama which exercised such an influence on his life and seems to have grown stronger as he grew older, and of which this very preface, written only a few months before his death, is such a striking proof.
The drama had by this time outgrown market-place stages and strolling companies, and with his old love for it he naturally turned to it for a congenial employment.
He was to found a great national drama, based on the true principles of art, that was to be the envy of all nations; he was to drive from the stage the silly, childish plays, the "mirrors of nonsense and models of folly" that were in vogue through the cupidity of the managers and shortsightedness of the authors; he was to correct and educate the public taste until it was ripe for tragedies on the model of the Greek drama--like the "Numancia" for instance--and comedies that would not only amuse but improve and instruct.
Whoever he may have been, it is clear that he was one of the dramatists of Lope's school, for he has the impudence to charge Cervantes with attacking him as well as Lope in his criticism on the drama.
The reader, however, was not to suppose they were his last word or final effort in the drama, for he had in hand a comedy called "Engano a los ojos," about which, if he mistook not, there would be no question.
And if truth to life is the main thing the drama should keep in view, how is it possible for any average understanding to be satisfied when the action is supposed to pass in the time of King Pepin or Charlemagne, and the principal personage in it they represent to be the Emperor Heraclius who entered Jerusalem with the cross and won the Holy Sepulchre, like Godfrey of Bouillon, there being years innumerable between the one and the other?
All this tends to the prejudice of the truth and the corruption of history, nay more, to the reproach of the wits of Spain; for foreigners who scrupulously observe the laws of the drama look upon us as barbarous and ignorant, when they see the absurdity and nonsense of the plays we produce.
Fresh scandals have eclipsed it, and their more piquant details have drawn the gossips away from this four-year-old drama.
I submissively expressed, by my silence, my acquiescence in all I had heard from my superior in years and knowledge; and we talked about The Stranger and the Drama, and the pairs of horses, until we came to Mr. Spenlow's gate.
Out of this revelation, part by part, at last came out the four acts of the gladness, and the one long, and as yet uncatastrophied fifth act of the grief of his life's drama.
Lord and master over all this scene, the captain stood erect on the ship's elevated quarter-deck, so that the whole rejoicing drama was full before him, and seemed merely contrived for his own individual diversion.

More Vocab Words

::: multifarious - varied; greatly diversified; Ex. multifarious activities
::: cordial - warmly friendly; gracious; heartfelt; Ex. cordial welcome
::: festive - joyous; celebratory; relating to a feast or festival
::: insurgent - rebellious; N.
::: concede - admit; acknowledge as being true (often reluctantly); yield; grant; Ex. concede a goal
::: serpentine - winding; twisting; of or like a serpent; Ex. serpentine course of the river; N. serpent: snake
::: hackneyed - commonplace; trite
::: nautical - pertaining to ships or navigation
::: tremulous - trembling; wavering
::: champion - support militantly; fight for; N: person who fights for or supports strongly (a principle, movement, person, etc.)