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Vocabulary Word

Word: distinctive

Definition: clearly different from others of the same kind


Sentences Containing 'distinctive'

They believe that every race which breeds true, let the distinctive characters be ever so slight, has had its wild prototype.
Thirdly, those characters which are mainly distinctive of each breed are in each eminently variable, for instance, the wattle and length of beak of the carrier, the shortness of that of the tumbler, and the number of tail-feathers in the fantail; and the explanation of this fact will be obvious when we treat of selection.
Four days were spent in thinking what name to give him, because (as he said to himself) it was not right that a horse belonging to a knight so famous, and one with such merits of his own, should be without some distinctive name, and he strove to adapt it so as to indicate what he had been before belonging to a knight-errant, and what he then was; for it was only reasonable that, his master taking a new character, he should take a new name, and that it should be a distinguished and full-sounding one, befitting the new order and calling he was about to follow.
He must be a theologian, so as to be able to give a clear and distinctive reason for the Christian faith he professes, wherever it may be asked of him.
Behind them came the Countess Trifaldi, the squire Trifaldin of the White Beard leading her by the hand, clad in the finest unnapped black baize, such that, had it a nap, every tuft would have shown as big as a Martos chickpea; the tail, or skirt, or whatever it might be called, ended in three points which were borne up by the hands of three pages, likewise dressed in mourning, forming an elegant geometrical figure with the three acute angles made by the three points, from which all who saw the peaked skirt concluded that it must be because of it the countess was called Trifaldi, as though it were Countess of the Three Skirts; and Benengeli says it was so, and that by her right name she was called the Countess Lobuna, because wolves bred in great numbers in her country; and if, instead of wolves, they had been foxes, she would have been called the Countess Zorruna, as it was the custom in those parts for lords to take distinctive titles from the thing or things most abundant in their dominions; this countess, however, in honour of the new fashion of her skirt, dropped Lobuna and took up Trifaldi.
"That clay and chalk mixture which I see upon your toe caps is quite distinctive."
But possessing all the grand distinctive features of the leviathan, most naturalists have recognised him for one.
The rest of his body was so streaked, and spotted, and marbled with the same shrouded hue, that, in the end, he had gained his distinctive appellation of the White Whale; a name, indeed, literally justified by his vivid aspect, when seen gliding at high noon through a dark blue sea, leaving a milky-way wake of creamy foam, all spangled with golden gleamings.

More Vocab Words

::: ungainly - (of someone) awkward in movement; clumsy; (of something) unwieldy; Ex. ungainly dancer/instrument
::: exploit - brave and successful act; deed or action, particularly a brave deed; CF. crossing the Atlantic ocean
::: lucre - money; profit; Ex. filthy lucre
::: coax - persuade by flattery
::: doctrine - teachings in general; particular principle (religious, legal, etc.) taught; dogma; tenet; ADJ. doctrinal
::: oust - expel; drive out; force out; N. ouster: ousting
::: arsenal - storage place for military equipment
::: destitute - extremely poor; lacking means of subsistence; utterly lacking; devoid; Ex. destitute of any experience
::: propound - put forth for consideration or analysis; set forth; Ex. propound a problem/theory
::: elaborate - work out carefully; add more detail or information; ADJ.