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Vocabulary Word

Word: dispassionate

Definition: calm; impartial; not influenced by personal feelings


Sentences Containing 'dispassionate'

'I think, Clara,' said Mr. Murdstone, in a low grave voice, 'that there may be better and more dispassionate judges of such a question than you.'
Although much remains obscure, and will long remain obscure, I can entertain no doubt, after the most deliberate study and dispassionate judgment of which I am capable, that the view which most naturalists until recently entertained, and which I formerly entertained--namely, that each species has been independently created--is erroneous.
And I have felt--we both have felt, I may say; my sister being fully in my confidence--that it is right you should receive this grave and dispassionate assurance from our lips.'
But the principle which prompts to save, is the desire of bettering our condition; a desire which, though generally calm and dispassionate, comes with us from the womb, and never leaves us till we go into the grave.
He represents in some sense a move in the direction of the scientific study of church history in the modern sense and similarly of hermeneutics, though no doubt his impelling motive was non dispassionate but polemical, namely to prove the false premisses of Roman Catholicism.
I come hither, O ye Athenians, to justify in your assembly what I maintained in my school, and I find myself impeached by furious antagonists, instead of reasoning with calm and dispassionate enquirers.
In particular, it refers to the dispassionate self-observation discussed in teachings such as the "Satipatthana Sutta".

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