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Vocabulary Word

Word: diffidence

Definition: shyness; lack of self-confidence; timidity; ADJ. diffident


Sentences Containing 'diffidence'

He spoke with the diffidence of a man who knew how slight a thing would overset the delicate organization of the mind, and yet with the confidence of a man who had slowly won his assurance out of personal endurance and distress.
His diffidence had prevented his depending on his own judgment in so anxious a case, but his reliance on mine made every thing easy.
I continu'd this method some few years, but gradually left it, retaining only the habit of expressing myself in terms of modest diffidence; never using, when I advanced any thing that may possibly be disputed, the words certainly, undoubtedly, or any others that give the air of positiveness to an opinion; but rather say, I conceive or apprehend a thing to be so and so; it appears to me, or I should think it so or so, for such and such reasons; or I imagine it to be so; or it is so, if I am not mistaken.
I profit so much by it myself, in many ways--at least I ought to--that no one can be more convinced of it than myself; and therefore I speak with great diffidence, my dear Jane, I assure you.'
Jane's temper was not desponding, and she was gradually led to hope, though the diffidence of affection sometimes overcame the hope, that Bingley would return to Netherfield and answer every wish of her heart.
Miss Darcy, though with a diffidence which marked her little in the habit of giving invitations, readily obeyed.
Mr. Cruncher, with some diffidence, explained himself as meaning``Old Nick's.''
Nor will its evidence be weakened by any general diffidence of the understanding, or sceptical suspicion concerning every conclusion which is new and extraordinary.
One day he said, a little hesitatingly, and with somewhat of diffidence`Triangle, would you mind coming down to my stateroom a minute, and have a little talk on a certain matter?'
Reason here seems to be thrown into a kind of amazement and suspence, which, without the suggestions of any sceptic, gives her a diffidence of herself, and of the ground on which she treads.
The blowing of the coach-horn in the yard was a seasonable diversion, which made me get up and hesitatingly inquire, in the mingled pride and diffidence of having a purse (which I took out of my pocket), if there were anything to pay.
There were a good many people, too, upon this occasion, who, from a diffidence of repayment, did not bring their silver into the Bank of Scotland; and there was, besides, some English coin, which was not called in.
This naturally introduced a panegyric from Jane on his diffidence, and the little value he put on his own good qualities.
Thus the empperor writes to his old friend, who had shown some diffidence in seeking an interview:(1) 'To MY MASTER.

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