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Vocabulary Word

Word: devoid

Definition: empty; lacking


Sentences Containing 'devoid'

You thought me then devoid of every proper feeling, I am sure you did.
It is of course improbable that even school studies done with the sole idea of accuracy by a young artist will in all cases be devoid of artistic feeling; it will creep in, if he has the artistic instinct.
The circular disc of the sun has the same static quality, being the curve most devoid of variety.
This is the most devoid of variety, and therefore of life, and is only used when an effect of great repose and aloofness from life is wanted; and even then, never without some variety in the minor parts to give vitality.
Now, I can not for one instant believe you so devoid of gallantry as to refuse a lady your escort when she even condescends to ask you for it.''
Cardenio was then in his right mind, free from any attack of that madness which so frequently carried him away, and seeing them dressed in a fashion so unusual among the frequenters of those wilds, could not help showing some surprise, especially when he heard them speak of his case as if it were a well-known matter (for the curate's words gave him to understand as much) so he replied to them thus: "I see plainly, sirs, whoever you may be, that Heaven, whose care it is to succour the good, and even the wicked very often, here, in this remote spot, cut off from human intercourse, sends me, though I deserve it not, those who seek to draw me away from this to some better retreat, showing me by many and forcible arguments how unreasonably I act in leading the life I do; but as they know, that if I escape from this evil I shall fall into another still greater, perhaps they will set me down as a weak-minded man, or, what is worse, one devoid of reason; nor would it be any wonder, for I myself can perceive that the effect of the recollection of my misfortunes is so great and works so powerfully to my ruin, that in spite of myself I become at times like a stone, without feeling or consciousness; and I come to feel the truth of it when they tell me and show me proofs of the things I have done when the terrible fit overmasters me; and all I can do is bewail my lot in vain, and idly curse my destiny, and plead for my madness by telling how it was caused, to any that care to hear it; for no reasonable beings on learning the cause will wonder at the effects; and if they cannot help me at least they will not blame me, and the repugnance they feel at my wild ways will turn into pity for my woes.
Don Juan told him that the new history described how Don Quixote, let him be who he might, took part there in a tilting at the ring, utterly devoid of invention, poor in mottoes, very poor in costume, though rich in sillinesses.
The case has, in some respects, been not entirely devoid of interest."
The matter is a perfectly trivial one"--he jerked his thumb in the direction of the old hat--"but there are points in connection with it which are not entirely devoid of interest and even of instruction."
The rugged eloquence with which he spoke, was not devoid of all effect.
If she were not true to it, might the object she now had in life, which bound her to something devoid of evil, in its passing away from her, leave her more forlorn and more despairing, if that were possible, than she had been upon the river's brink that night; and then might all help, human and Divine, renounce her evermore!

More Vocab Words

::: concentric - having a common center
::: idyllic - charmingly carefree; simple and happy; Ex. idyllic scene
::: facsimile - copy
::: foresight - ability to foresee future happenings; prudence in providing for the future
::: jetsam - things thrown from a ship (to lighten the ship)
::: emaciated - thin and wasted (from hunger or illness)
::: digression - wandering away from the subject; V. digress
::: prolong - lengthen; extend; draw out
::: verisimilitude - appearance of truth; quality of appearing to be true or real; likelihood; Ex. verisimilitude of her performance as Lady Macbeth
::: bequeath - leave to someone by means of a will; hand down in his will; N. bequest