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Vocabulary Word

Word: desperate

Definition: having lost all hope; despairing; reckless and violent because of loss of hope or despair; undertaken as a last resort


Sentences Containing 'desperate'

Rendered in a manner desperate, by her state and by the beckoning of their conductor, he drew over his neck the arm that shook upon his shoulder, lifted her a little, and hurried her into the room.
This favored the desperate resolution Charles Darnay had begun to make, that he would go to Paris.
``In short,''said Sydney,``this is a desperate time, when desperate games are played for desperate stakes.
``I am a Briton,''said Miss Pross,``I am desperate.
Very little was said by either; Kitty was too much afraid of him to talk; Elizabeth was secretly forming a desperate resolution; and perhaps he might be doing the same.
From the desperate city you go into the desperate country, and have to console yourself with the bravery of minks and muskrats.
But it is a characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things.
But, wherever a man goes, men will pursue and paw him with their dirty institutions, and, if they can, constrain him to belong to their desperate odd fellow society.
It is true, I might have resisted forcibly with more or less effect, might have run``amok''against society; but I preferred that society should run``amok''against me, it being the desperate party.
This was manly, as the world goes; and yet it was idle, if not desperate.
Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed and in such desperate enterprises?
It had a desperate reputation, morally, in the old keel boating and early steamboating times plenty of drinking, carousing, fisticuffing, and killing there, among the riff raff of the river, in those days.
The current running down the Atchafalaya was very swift, the Mississippi showing a predilection in that direction, which needs only to be seen to enforce the opinion of that river's desperate endeavors to find a short way to the Gulf.
Yes, I heard this news, and knew it even before you could; for three days ago I posted from Marseilles to Paris with all possible speed, half desperate at the enforced delay.''
It was the last yearning for life contending with the resolution of despair; then his dungeon seemed less sombre, his prospects less desperate.
But the sight of an old man clinging to life with so desperate a courage, gave a fresh turn to his ideas, and inspired him with new courage.
Dantes followed; his features were no longer contracted, and now wore their usual expression, but there was that in his whole appearance that bespoke one who had come to a fixed and desperate resolve.
He then bent his body, and by a desperate effort severed the cord that bound his legs, at the moment when it seemed as if he were actually strangled.
He rose again to the surface, struggled with the last desperate effort of a drowning man, uttered a third cry, and felt himself sinking, as if the fatal cannon shot were again tied to his feet.
What need he add to such a desperate proof in figures?''
Caderousse, who had raised himself on his knees, and stretched out his arm, tried to draw back, then clasping his hands, and raising them with a desperate effort,``O my God, my God!''
And the poor horse resumed the desperate gallop it had kept up since leaving the barrier, and arrived steaming at Louvres.
One day, in a moment of despair like yours, since it led to a similar resolution, I also wished to kill myself; one day your father, equally desperate, wished to kill himself too.
One division of La Force, in which the most dangerous and desperate prisoners are confined, is called the court of Saint Bernard.
They are desperate, and act with the folly and extravagance of desperate men, who must either starve, or frighten their masters into an immediate compliance with their demands.
Sancho, hearing himself called, quitted the shepherds, and, prodding Dapple vigorously, came up to his master, to whom there fell a terrific and desperate adventure.
O furious force of jealousy, to what desperate lengths dost thou lead those that give thee lodging in their bosoms!
Little Em'ly consenting, and allowing me to kiss her, I became desperate; informing her, I recollect, that I never could love another, and that I was prepared to shed the blood of anybody who should aspire to her affections.
I have already observed that I don't know how this desperate idea came into my brain.
I only know that there were three alarms before the bath was ready; and that on the occasion of the last and most desperate of all, I saw my aunt engage, single-handed, with a sandy-headed lad of fifteen, and bump his sandy head against her own gate, before he seemed to comprehend what was the matter.
When he was gone, I rang for Mrs. Crupp, and acquainted her with my desperate design.
He is one of the most dangerous men in England--a ruined gambler, an absolutely desperate villain, a man without heart or conscience.
I am not sure whether I have mentioned that, when Mr. Micawber was at any particularly desperate crisis, he used a sort of legal phraseology, which he seemed to think equivalent to winding up his affairs.
After many compliments on this performance, we fell into some general conversation; and as I was too full of my desperate intentions to keep my altered circumstances to myself, I made them known to Mr. and Mrs. Micawber.
As yet, little Dora was quite unconscious of my desperate firmness, otherwise than as my letters darkly shadowed it forth.
I hurriedly made him a reply to the effect, that I hoped the error into which I had been betrayed by the desperate nature of my love, did not induce him to think me mercenary too?
Mr. Micawber, with a random but expressive flourish of his knife, signified that these performances might be expected to take place after he was no more; then resumed his peeling with a desperate air.
Against such a sight, and against such determination as that of the calmly desperate man who was already accustomed to lead half the people present, I might as hopefully have entreated the wind.
Hatta made a desperate effort, and swallowed a large piece of bread-and-butter.
The case seemed wholly desperate and deplorable; and this magnificent palace would have infallibly been burnt down to the ground, if, by a presence of mind unusual to me, I had not suddenly thought of an expedient.
I began this desperate voyage on February 15, 1714–15, at nine o’clock in the morning.
Struck by his desperate dauntlessness, and his wild desire to visit Christendom, the captain at last relented, and told him he might make himself at home.
I know, too, that ever since he lost his leg last voyage by that accursed whale, he's been a kind of moody--desperate moody, and savage sometimes; but that will all pass off.
Whether that mark was born with him, or whether it was the scar left by some desperate wound, no one could certainly say.
How wildly it heightens the effect of that passage in Froissart, when, masked in the snowy symbol of their faction, the desperate White Hoods of Ghent murder their bailiff in the market-place!
On the fifth morning three others of the mutineers bolted up into the air from the desperate arms below that sought to restrain them.
But by desperate endeavor we at last shot into a temporary opening; then giving way rapidly, and at the same time earnestly watching for another outlet.
"Is the Duke so very poor as to be forced to this desperate mode of getting a livelihood?"
Then again, if it stays here, that is ugly, too, for when aught's nailed to the mast it's a sign that things grow desperate.
But one night, under cover of darkness, and further concealed in a most cunning disguisement, a desperate burglar slid into his happy home, and robbed them all of everything.

More Vocab Words

::: accost - approach and speak first to a person
::: panegyric - formal praise; encomium; Ex. I don't deserve such panegyrics.
::: ineffectual - not effective; not having a desired effect; weak
::: throng - crowd (of people or things); V.
::: ideology - system of ideas characteristic of a group or culture
::: preeminent - outstanding; superior
::: quicksilver - mercury
::: impediment - hindrance; stumbling-block; speech defect preventing clear articulation; Ex. speech impediment
::: stentorian - (of the voice) extremely loud; CF. Stentor: a loud herald in the Iliad
::: premonitory - serving to warn